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Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars

Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars
Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars
In this paper we model the gravitational wave emission of a freely precessing neutron star. The aim is to estimate likely source strengths, as a guide for gravitational wave astronomers searching for such signals. We model the star as a partly elastic, partly fluid body with quadrupolar deformations of its moment of inertia tensor. The angular amplitude of the free precession is limited by the finite breaking strain of the star's crust. The effect of internal dissipation on the star is important, with the precession angle being rapidly damped in the case of a star with an oblate deformation. We then go on to study detailed scenarios where free precession is created and/or maintained by some astrophysical mechanism. We consider the effects of accretion torques, electromagnetic torques, glitches and stellar encounters. We find that the mechanisms considered are either too weak to lead to a signal detectable by an Advanced LIGO interferometer, or occur too infrequently to give a reasonable event rate. We therefore conclude that, using our stellar model at least, free precession is not a good candidate for detection by the forthcoming laser interferometers.
0035-8711
203-220
Jones, D.I.
b8f3e32c-d537-445a-a1e4-7436f472e160
Andersson, N.
2dd6d1ee-cefd-478a-b1ac-e6feedafe304
Jones, D.I.
b8f3e32c-d537-445a-a1e4-7436f472e160
Andersson, N.
2dd6d1ee-cefd-478a-b1ac-e6feedafe304

Jones, D.I. and Andersson, N. (2002) Gravitational waves from freely precessing neutron stars. Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 331 (1), 203-220. (doi:10.1046/j.1365-8711.2002.05180.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In this paper we model the gravitational wave emission of a freely precessing neutron star. The aim is to estimate likely source strengths, as a guide for gravitational wave astronomers searching for such signals. We model the star as a partly elastic, partly fluid body with quadrupolar deformations of its moment of inertia tensor. The angular amplitude of the free precession is limited by the finite breaking strain of the star's crust. The effect of internal dissipation on the star is important, with the precession angle being rapidly damped in the case of a star with an oblate deformation. We then go on to study detailed scenarios where free precession is created and/or maintained by some astrophysical mechanism. We consider the effects of accretion torques, electromagnetic torques, glitches and stellar encounters. We find that the mechanisms considered are either too weak to lead to a signal detectable by an Advanced LIGO interferometer, or occur too infrequently to give a reasonable event rate. We therefore conclude that, using our stellar model at least, free precession is not a good candidate for detection by the forthcoming laser interferometers.

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Published date: 2002

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40539
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40539
ISSN: 0035-8711
PURE UUID: 6f62afd6-a55a-456f-b7d6-268cb78ffd17
ORCID for D.I. Jones: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0117-7567
ORCID for N. Andersson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8550-3843

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Jul 2006
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 02:50

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