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Motion sickness in public road transport: Passenger behaviour and susceptibility

Motion sickness in public road transport: Passenger behaviour and susceptibility
Motion sickness in public road transport: Passenger behaviour and susceptibility

The aim of this research was to identify personal and environmental factors influencing individual susceptibility to motion sickness during road transport. A questionnaire survey of 3256 coach travellers was conducted. Information on passenger characteristics, travel regularity, activity during travel, use of anti-motion sickness drugs and self-reported motion sickness susceptibility were collected over 56 private hire coach journeys. Details of the travel environment (visibility, temperature and seating) were also recorded. The relationship of these variables with passenger illness and more specific symptoms of motion sickness are examined. Overall, 28.4% of passengers reported feeling ill, 12.8% reported nausea and 1.7% reported vomiting during coach travel. Travel sickness decreased with increasing passenger age and greater travel experience. Females were more likely to report feeling ill during coach travel than males by a ratio of four to three. Poor forward visibility was found to increase sickness. Passenger illness occurrence was approximately three times higher for passengers with no view of the road ahead (mean, 34.6%) compared to passengers who could see the road ahead extremely well (mean, 12.7%). No relationships were found between the occurrence of travel sickness and temperature or time of travel. Differences in the pattern of sickness responses exhibited by coach travellers suggest: (1) habituation through greater travel regularity may occur independently of reductions in travel sickness that occur with age; (2) females are more affected by poor forward visibility than males; and (3) the incidence of travel sickness could be significantly reduced by improving the external visibility afforded to passengers.

Habituation, Motion sickness, Susceptibility, Visibility
0014-0139
444-461
Turner, Mark
d41bc3a2-c790-4204-8635-99559965836a
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Turner, Mark
d41bc3a2-c790-4204-8635-99559965836a
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Turner, Mark and Griffin, Michael J. (1999) Motion sickness in public road transport: Passenger behaviour and susceptibility. Ergonomics, 42 (3), 444-461. (doi:10.1080/001401399185586).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of this research was to identify personal and environmental factors influencing individual susceptibility to motion sickness during road transport. A questionnaire survey of 3256 coach travellers was conducted. Information on passenger characteristics, travel regularity, activity during travel, use of anti-motion sickness drugs and self-reported motion sickness susceptibility were collected over 56 private hire coach journeys. Details of the travel environment (visibility, temperature and seating) were also recorded. The relationship of these variables with passenger illness and more specific symptoms of motion sickness are examined. Overall, 28.4% of passengers reported feeling ill, 12.8% reported nausea and 1.7% reported vomiting during coach travel. Travel sickness decreased with increasing passenger age and greater travel experience. Females were more likely to report feeling ill during coach travel than males by a ratio of four to three. Poor forward visibility was found to increase sickness. Passenger illness occurrence was approximately three times higher for passengers with no view of the road ahead (mean, 34.6%) compared to passengers who could see the road ahead extremely well (mean, 12.7%). No relationships were found between the occurrence of travel sickness and temperature or time of travel. Differences in the pattern of sickness responses exhibited by coach travellers suggest: (1) habituation through greater travel regularity may occur independently of reductions in travel sickness that occur with age; (2) females are more affected by poor forward visibility than males; and (3) the incidence of travel sickness could be significantly reduced by improving the external visibility afforded to passengers.

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More information

Published date: March 1999
Keywords: Habituation, Motion sickness, Susceptibility, Visibility
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406262
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406262
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: c629d927-fa22-4a0c-add4-d3b3fee2f435
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2017 10:43
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:59

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