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Developing a simplified finite element model of a car seat with occupant for predicting vibration transmissibility in the vertical direction

Developing a simplified finite element model of a car seat with occupant for predicting vibration transmissibility in the vertical direction
Developing a simplified finite element model of a car seat with occupant for predicting vibration transmissibility in the vertical direction

The transmissibility of seat depends on the dynamics of both the seat and the human body, and shows how the amplification and attenuation of vibration varies with the frequency of vibration. A systematic methodology was developed for finite element (FE) modelling of the dynamic interaction between a seat and the human body and predicting the transmissibility of a seat. A seat model was developed to improve computational efficiency before models of the seat pan and backrest were calibrated separately using load–deflection and dynamic stiffness measurements, joined to form the complete seat model, and integrated with the model of a manikin for further calibration. The calibrated seat model was combined with a human body model to predict the transmissibility of the seat. By combining a calibrated seat model with a calibrated human body model, and defining appropriate contacts between the two models, the vibration transmissibility with a seat–occupant system can be predicted.

apparent mass, dynamic stiffness, finite element model, seat transmissibility
0014-0139
1220-1231
Zhang, Xiaolu
8606e0a1-c6fd-42f5-8e74-d3f7923649a3
Qiu, Yi
ef9eae54-bdf3-4084-816a-0ecbf6a0e9da
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Zhang, Xiaolu
8606e0a1-c6fd-42f5-8e74-d3f7923649a3
Qiu, Yi
ef9eae54-bdf3-4084-816a-0ecbf6a0e9da
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Zhang, Xiaolu, Qiu, Yi and Griffin, Michael J. (2015) Developing a simplified finite element model of a car seat with occupant for predicting vibration transmissibility in the vertical direction. Ergonomics, 58 (7), 1220-1231. (doi:10.1080/00140139.2015.1005165).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The transmissibility of seat depends on the dynamics of both the seat and the human body, and shows how the amplification and attenuation of vibration varies with the frequency of vibration. A systematic methodology was developed for finite element (FE) modelling of the dynamic interaction between a seat and the human body and predicting the transmissibility of a seat. A seat model was developed to improve computational efficiency before models of the seat pan and backrest were calibrated separately using load–deflection and dynamic stiffness measurements, joined to form the complete seat model, and integrated with the model of a manikin for further calibration. The calibrated seat model was combined with a human body model to predict the transmissibility of the seat. By combining a calibrated seat model with a calibrated human body model, and defining appropriate contacts between the two models, the vibration transmissibility with a seat–occupant system can be predicted.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 December 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 February 2015
Published date: 3 July 2015
Keywords: apparent mass, dynamic stiffness, finite element model, seat transmissibility
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406275
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406275
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: f800956b-981a-4b07-8b95-7b1c3ba061bb
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2017 10:43
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:48

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