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Reactive iron delivery to the Gulf of Alaska via a Kenai eddy

Reactive iron delivery to the Gulf of Alaska via a Kenai eddy
Reactive iron delivery to the Gulf of Alaska via a Kenai eddy

Mesoscale anticyclonic eddies in the Gulf of Alaska are an important mechanism for cross-shelf exchange of high iron, low nitrate coastal waters and low iron, high nitrate offshore waters. A Kenai eddy was sampled in September 2007, 8 months after formation. The subsurface eddy core layer contained reactive iron concentrations more than eight times greater than waters at the same depths outside the eddy. The subsurface core of the Kenai eddy (25.4≤σθ≤25.8) is suggested to be seasonally important as these waters can be brought to the surface with storm events and deep winter mixing. The deeper core layer (25.8≤σθ≤27.0) is suggested to be a source of iron to HNLC waters on a longer timescale, due to isopycnal mixing and eventual eddy relaxation. The subsurface and deeper core layers are important reservoirs of iron that can promote and sustain primary productivity over the lifetime of the Kenai eddy. In addition, dissolved and leachable particulate manganese are shown to be excellent tracers of eddy surface and subsurface waters, respectively.

Gulf of Alaska, Iron, Oceanic eddies, Reactive iron
0967-0637
1091-1102
Lippiatt, Sherry M.
88a7b0f6-f120-4a54-86fe-ce0fe9081b93
Brown, Matthew T.
dc9b92df-a3e0-47ee-abff-1c0fff827ce3
Lohan, Maeve C.
6ca10597-2d0f-40e8-8e4f-7619dfac5088
Bruland, Kenneth W.
f3e947c6-f9b7-435c-ac84-b3476306a368
Lippiatt, Sherry M.
88a7b0f6-f120-4a54-86fe-ce0fe9081b93
Brown, Matthew T.
dc9b92df-a3e0-47ee-abff-1c0fff827ce3
Lohan, Maeve C.
6ca10597-2d0f-40e8-8e4f-7619dfac5088
Bruland, Kenneth W.
f3e947c6-f9b7-435c-ac84-b3476306a368

Lippiatt, Sherry M., Brown, Matthew T., Lohan, Maeve C. and Bruland, Kenneth W. (2011) Reactive iron delivery to the Gulf of Alaska via a Kenai eddy. Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers, 58 (11), 1091-1102. (doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2011.08.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Mesoscale anticyclonic eddies in the Gulf of Alaska are an important mechanism for cross-shelf exchange of high iron, low nitrate coastal waters and low iron, high nitrate offshore waters. A Kenai eddy was sampled in September 2007, 8 months after formation. The subsurface eddy core layer contained reactive iron concentrations more than eight times greater than waters at the same depths outside the eddy. The subsurface core of the Kenai eddy (25.4≤σθ≤25.8) is suggested to be seasonally important as these waters can be brought to the surface with storm events and deep winter mixing. The deeper core layer (25.8≤σθ≤27.0) is suggested to be a source of iron to HNLC waters on a longer timescale, due to isopycnal mixing and eventual eddy relaxation. The subsurface and deeper core layers are important reservoirs of iron that can promote and sustain primary productivity over the lifetime of the Kenai eddy. In addition, dissolved and leachable particulate manganese are shown to be excellent tracers of eddy surface and subsurface waters, respectively.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 August 2011
Published date: November 2011
Keywords: Gulf of Alaska, Iron, Oceanic eddies, Reactive iron
Organisations: Marine Biogeochemistry, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406477
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406477
ISSN: 0967-0637
PURE UUID: 31bce647-0829-4123-b16b-575b4f499388

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Mar 2017 02:20
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 20:11

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