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The influence of end-stop buffer characteristics on the severity of suspension seat end-stop impacts

The influence of end-stop buffer characteristics on the severity of suspension seat end-stop impacts
The influence of end-stop buffer characteristics on the severity of suspension seat end-stop impacts

Suspension seat end-stop impacts may be a source of increased risk of injury for the drivers of some machines and work vehicles, such as off-road vehicles. Most suspension seats use rubber buffers to reduce the severity of end-stop impacts, but they still result in a high magnitude of acceleration being transmitted to drivers when an end-stop impact occurs. An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the effect of buffer stiffness and buffer damping on the severity of end-stop impacts. The results show that the end-stop impact performance of suspension seats with only bottom buffers can be improved by the use of both top and bottom buffers. The force-deflection characteristics of rubber buffers had a significant influence on the severity of end-stop impacts. The optimum buffer should have medium stiffness which is nearly linear and occurs over a long deflection, without being compressed to its high stiffness stage. It is shown, theoretically, that buffer damping is capable of significantly reducing the severity of end-stop impacts. However, since current rubber material provides only low damping, alternative materials to those in current use, or either passive or active damping devices, are required.

0022-460X
989-996
Wu, X.
bb3a0609-dae5-4ba5-b650-86b064f7771d
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Wu, X.
bb3a0609-dae5-4ba5-b650-86b064f7771d
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Wu, X. and Griffin, M. J. (1998) The influence of end-stop buffer characteristics on the severity of suspension seat end-stop impacts. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 215 (4), 989-996. (doi:10.1006/jsvi.1998.1597).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Suspension seat end-stop impacts may be a source of increased risk of injury for the drivers of some machines and work vehicles, such as off-road vehicles. Most suspension seats use rubber buffers to reduce the severity of end-stop impacts, but they still result in a high magnitude of acceleration being transmitted to drivers when an end-stop impact occurs. An experimental study has been conducted to investigate the effect of buffer stiffness and buffer damping on the severity of end-stop impacts. The results show that the end-stop impact performance of suspension seats with only bottom buffers can be improved by the use of both top and bottom buffers. The force-deflection characteristics of rubber buffers had a significant influence on the severity of end-stop impacts. The optimum buffer should have medium stiffness which is nearly linear and occurs over a long deflection, without being compressed to its high stiffness stage. It is shown, theoretically, that buffer damping is capable of significantly reducing the severity of end-stop impacts. However, since current rubber material provides only low damping, alternative materials to those in current use, or either passive or active damping devices, are required.

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More information

Published date: 27 August 1998
Organisations: University of Southampton

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406704
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406704
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: d5e56f42-26ac-49a0-bc2a-ecb9f73876a7
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 18 Mar 2017 02:29
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:47

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