The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Taiwan’s traditional security challenges as a contested state

Taiwan’s traditional security challenges as a contested state
Taiwan’s traditional security challenges as a contested state
The People's Republic of China’s desire to retake Taiwan stems from its concerns over territorial integrity, the Chinese Communist Party’s regime survival, as well as Beijing’s perception of the geostrategic importance of Taiwan. Nevertheless, Taiwan’s survival as a contested state since 1971 has constrained its ability to strengthen its military capabilities. Taiwan’s traditional security challenges have deepened over time primarily because of the slanting military balance across the Taiwan Strait following the People's Liberation Army’s (PLA) ambitious modernization. The PLA has obtained ground, air and naval superiority over its Taiwanese counterpart and improved its C4ISR, information warfare, and A2/AD capabilities. The uncertain semi-alliance relationship with the U.S.A. and pitfalls in Taiwan’s defense reforms have complicated these deepening security threats from across the Strait. The grueling national security tests Taiwan faces today are onerous.
Taiwan, People's Liberation Army (PLA) modernization, U.S.A., contested state, Taiwan Strait, China-U.S. relations
Routledge
Chu, Ming-Chin Monique
a9f472b8-016d-48a2-927d-d9df73a0fa87
Ganguly, Sumit
Scobell, Andrew
Liow, Joseph Chinyong
Chu, Ming-Chin Monique
a9f472b8-016d-48a2-927d-d9df73a0fa87
Ganguly, Sumit
Scobell, Andrew
Liow, Joseph Chinyong

Chu, Ming-Chin Monique (2017) Taiwan’s traditional security challenges as a contested state In, Ganguly, Sumit, Scobell, Andrew and Liow, Joseph Chinyong (eds.) The Routledge Handbook of Asian Security Studies. 2nd ed. New York and London, Routledge

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The People's Republic of China’s desire to retake Taiwan stems from its concerns over territorial integrity, the Chinese Communist Party’s regime survival, as well as Beijing’s perception of the geostrategic importance of Taiwan. Nevertheless, Taiwan’s survival as a contested state since 1971 has constrained its ability to strengthen its military capabilities. Taiwan’s traditional security challenges have deepened over time primarily because of the slanting military balance across the Taiwan Strait following the People's Liberation Army’s (PLA) ambitious modernization. The PLA has obtained ground, air and naval superiority over its Taiwanese counterpart and improved its C4ISR, information warfare, and A2/AD capabilities. The uncertain semi-alliance relationship with the U.S.A. and pitfalls in Taiwan’s defense reforms have complicated these deepening security threats from across the Strait. The grueling national security tests Taiwan faces today are onerous.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2017
Keywords: Taiwan, People's Liberation Army (PLA) modernization, U.S.A., contested state, Taiwan Strait, China-U.S. relations
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406901
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406901
PURE UUID: 09260d7f-ee93-4829-b18b-79578dcc249c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Mar 2017 02:07
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 14:02

Export record

Contributors

Editor: Sumit Ganguly
Editor: Andrew Scobell
Editor: Joseph Chinyong Liow

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×