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Footwear related problems following stroke: qualitative study of the views and experience of people with stroke in the SHOES Study

Footwear related problems following stroke: qualitative study of the views and experience of people with stroke in the SHOES Study
Footwear related problems following stroke: qualitative study of the views and experience of people with stroke in the SHOES Study
Purpose: Foot problems and suboptimal footwear are risk factors for falls among the elderly. Footwear choice may therefore be important for people with balance impairment following stroke but little is known about their experience. This study explored foot problems experienced following stroke, factors influencing footwear choices and views of footwear in use.
Methods: Eligibility criteria were diagnosis of a stroke, able to walk and willingness to participate. Semi structured interviews with 15 people with stroke [PwS], purposively sampled from respondents to a screening survey. The sampling process drew on information about mobility (with or without falls), reliance on walking aids or other people, able to walk more than ¼ mile. Interviews were conducted in participant’s homes. Participants were asked to make available for discussion items of footwear currently being worn indoors and out. Data were managed and analysed thematically using Framework.
Results: The sample comprised 15 people, 8 men and 7 women ranging in age from 52-84 years; mean 71 years with varying levels of mobility. Participants typically experienced impaired mobility with balance problems and felt at risk of falling. Stroke related foot problems, including altered sensation, oedema, and foot drop, predominantly on the stroke affected side, influenced footwear priorities. Footwear choices prioritised comfort, security and convenience, sometimes in tension with concern about appearance. Challenges included choosing appropriate indoor footwear and finding shoes to accommodate orthoses and oedema. Participants highlighted perceived lack of footwear advice from health care professionals [HCPs] and variable experience of shoe shopping.
Conclusion(s): Foot problems, as well as gait and balance impairment, have implications for footwear priorities following stroke but PwS feel unsupported in making healthy footwear choices. HCPs could be trained to routinely deliver footwear assessment and advice and facilitate referrals to specialist podiatry services where appropriate
Ashburn, Ann
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Ashburn, Ann
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991

Ashburn, Ann (2017) Footwear related problems following stroke: qualitative study of the views and experience of people with stroke in the SHOES Study. World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2017, Cape Town, South Africa. 02 - 04 Jul 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Purpose: Foot problems and suboptimal footwear are risk factors for falls among the elderly. Footwear choice may therefore be important for people with balance impairment following stroke but little is known about their experience. This study explored foot problems experienced following stroke, factors influencing footwear choices and views of footwear in use.
Methods: Eligibility criteria were diagnosis of a stroke, able to walk and willingness to participate. Semi structured interviews with 15 people with stroke [PwS], purposively sampled from respondents to a screening survey. The sampling process drew on information about mobility (with or without falls), reliance on walking aids or other people, able to walk more than ¼ mile. Interviews were conducted in participant’s homes. Participants were asked to make available for discussion items of footwear currently being worn indoors and out. Data were managed and analysed thematically using Framework.
Results: The sample comprised 15 people, 8 men and 7 women ranging in age from 52-84 years; mean 71 years with varying levels of mobility. Participants typically experienced impaired mobility with balance problems and felt at risk of falling. Stroke related foot problems, including altered sensation, oedema, and foot drop, predominantly on the stroke affected side, influenced footwear priorities. Footwear choices prioritised comfort, security and convenience, sometimes in tension with concern about appearance. Challenges included choosing appropriate indoor footwear and finding shoes to accommodate orthoses and oedema. Participants highlighted perceived lack of footwear advice from health care professionals [HCPs] and variable experience of shoe shopping.
Conclusion(s): Foot problems, as well as gait and balance impairment, have implications for footwear priorities following stroke but PwS feel unsupported in making healthy footwear choices. HCPs could be trained to routinely deliver footwear assessment and advice and facilitate referrals to specialist podiatry services where appropriate

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 February 2017
Published date: July 2017
Venue - Dates: World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2017, Cape Town, South Africa, 2017-07-02 - 2017-07-04
Organisations: Researcher Development

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 406970
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/406970
PURE UUID: 12bc301b-a8c8-4197-8c1b-201417d1ea7a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 Mar 2017 01:05
Last modified: 29 Nov 2018 17:31

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Contributors

Author: Ann Ashburn

University divisions

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