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Tics and Tourette Syndrome

Tics and Tourette Syndrome
Tics and Tourette Syndrome
Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from simple motor and phonic tics to complex movement cascades, and echophenomena and coprophenomena. Moreover, Tourette syndrome is frequently accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, often leading to a higher psychosocial impairment than tics. Tics are typically associated with an uncontrollable, uncomfortable, premonitory urge to execute the tic. Although Tourette syndrome is highly heritable, no single gene could be identified as a main risk factor for developing tics, yet. Moreover, the severity of Tourette syndrome can be influenced by environmental factors such as stress or attention. Pathophysiologically, Tourette syndrome has been repeatedly associated with abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical loops and the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system. In accordance with these observations, successful treatment measures include neuroleptics, behavioural therapy and in severe cases tetra-hydro-cannabinol and deep brain stimulation of some of the structures in cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical loops.
291-302
Springer Vienna
Brandt, Valerie
e41f5832-70e4-407d-8a15-85b861761656
Münchau, Alexander
3254c1b7-9fd4-417d-96e2-b7bc1fe3c736
Falup-Pecurariu, C.
Ferreira, J.
Martinez-Martin, P.
Chaudhuri, K.R.
Brandt, Valerie
e41f5832-70e4-407d-8a15-85b861761656
Münchau, Alexander
3254c1b7-9fd4-417d-96e2-b7bc1fe3c736
Falup-Pecurariu, C.
Ferreira, J.
Martinez-Martin, P.
Chaudhuri, K.R.

Brandt, Valerie and Münchau, Alexander (2017) Tics and Tourette Syndrome. In, Falup-Pecurariu, C., Ferreira, J., Martinez-Martin, P. and Chaudhuri, K.R. (eds.) Movement Disorders Curricula. 1 ed. Springer Vienna, pp. 291-302. (doi:10.1007/978-3-7091-1628-9).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by a wide variety of symptoms, ranging from simple motor and phonic tics to complex movement cascades, and echophenomena and coprophenomena. Moreover, Tourette syndrome is frequently accompanied by obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, often leading to a higher psychosocial impairment than tics. Tics are typically associated with an uncontrollable, uncomfortable, premonitory urge to execute the tic. Although Tourette syndrome is highly heritable, no single gene could be identified as a main risk factor for developing tics, yet. Moreover, the severity of Tourette syndrome can be influenced by environmental factors such as stress or attention. Pathophysiologically, Tourette syndrome has been repeatedly associated with abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical loops and the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system. In accordance with these observations, successful treatment measures include neuroleptics, behavioural therapy and in severe cases tetra-hydro-cannabinol and deep brain stimulation of some of the structures in cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical loops.

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Published date: 2017
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407013
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407013
PURE UUID: 91e3e932-4359-424b-9710-4cf31998cfe9

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Date deposited: 29 Mar 2017 01:10
Last modified: 06 Dec 2018 17:34

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