The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Dual target search is neither purely simultaneous nor purely successive

Dual target search is neither purely simultaneous nor purely successive
Dual target search is neither purely simultaneous nor purely successive
Previous research shows that visual search for two different targets is less efficient than search for a single target. Stroud, Menneer, Cave and Donnelly (2012) concluded that two target colours are represented separately based on modeling the fixation patterns. Although those analyses provide evidence for two separate target representations, they do not show whether participants search simultaneously for both targets, or first search for one target and then the other. Some studies suggest that multiple target representations are simultaneously active, while others indicate that search can be voluntarily simultaneous, or switching, or a mixture of both. Stroud et al.’s participants were not explicitly instructed to use any particular strategy. These data were revisited to determine which strategy was employed. Each fixated item was categorised according to whether its colour was more similar to one target or the other. Once an item similar to one target is fixated, the next fixated item is more likely to be similar to that target than the other, showing that at a given moment during search, one target is generally favoured. However, the search for one target is not completed before search for the other begins. Instead, there are often short runs of one or two fixations to distractors similar to one target, with each run followed by a switch to the other target. Thus, the results suggest that one target is more highly weighted than the other at any given time, but not to the extent that search is purely successive.
0272-4995
169-178
Cave, Kyle R.
041724d2-59ef-44bc-91e5-a855bba6daf5
Menneer, Tamaryn
d684eaf6-1494-4004-9973-cb8ccc628efa
Nomani, Mohammad S.
da420eb4-ebb9-42da-b6f7-a36f79ba7cfa
Stroud, Michael, J.
6b73466a-82db-4418-88e1-76ff4fc31d12
Donnelly, Nicholas
05c83b6b-ee8d-4c9d-85dc-c5dcd6b5427b
Cave, Kyle R.
041724d2-59ef-44bc-91e5-a855bba6daf5
Menneer, Tamaryn
d684eaf6-1494-4004-9973-cb8ccc628efa
Nomani, Mohammad S.
da420eb4-ebb9-42da-b6f7-a36f79ba7cfa
Stroud, Michael, J.
6b73466a-82db-4418-88e1-76ff4fc31d12
Donnelly, Nicholas
05c83b6b-ee8d-4c9d-85dc-c5dcd6b5427b

Cave, Kyle R., Menneer, Tamaryn, Nomani, Mohammad S., Stroud, Michael, J. and Donnelly, Nicholas (2018) Dual target search is neither purely simultaneous nor purely successive. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology Section B, 71 (1), 169-178. (doi:10.1080/17470218.2017.1307425).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous research shows that visual search for two different targets is less efficient than search for a single target. Stroud, Menneer, Cave and Donnelly (2012) concluded that two target colours are represented separately based on modeling the fixation patterns. Although those analyses provide evidence for two separate target representations, they do not show whether participants search simultaneously for both targets, or first search for one target and then the other. Some studies suggest that multiple target representations are simultaneously active, while others indicate that search can be voluntarily simultaneous, or switching, or a mixture of both. Stroud et al.’s participants were not explicitly instructed to use any particular strategy. These data were revisited to determine which strategy was employed. Each fixated item was categorised according to whether its colour was more similar to one target or the other. Once an item similar to one target is fixated, the next fixated item is more likely to be similar to that target than the other, showing that at a given moment during search, one target is generally favoured. However, the search for one target is not completed before search for the other begins. Instead, there are often short runs of one or two fixations to distractors similar to one target, with each run followed by a switch to the other target. Thus, the results suggest that one target is more highly weighted than the other at any given time, but not to the extent that search is purely successive.

Text
CaveMenneerNomaniStroudDonnellyQJEP - Accepted Manuscript
Download (916kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 January 2018
Published date: January 2018
Organisations: Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407144
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407144
ISSN: 0272-4995
PURE UUID: 7cc827b6-681f-43ef-a9c2-be34f4f22569

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Mar 2017 01:08
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 06:03

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×