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A preliminary evaluation of a home-based, computer-delivered attention training treatment for anxious children living in regional communities

A preliminary evaluation of a home-based, computer-delivered attention training treatment for anxious children living in regional communities
A preliminary evaluation of a home-based, computer-delivered attention training treatment for anxious children living in regional communities
Many children with anxiety disorders live in communities with limited access to treatment. Attention bias modification training, a promising computer-based treatment for anxiety disorders, may provide a readily accessible treatment. Recent evidence suggests that a form of ABMT combining visual-search for positive stimuli with features to enhance learning, memory and treatment engagement reduces anxiety in children. The present study builds upon this research by comparing parent-implemented, visual-search attention training to positive stimuli (ATP) (N = 22) with a waitlist control group (WLC) (N = 19) in children living in regional communities. Diagnostic, parent- and child-reports of anxiety and depressive symptoms and broad internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems were assessed pre- and post-condition. Children in the WLC completed visual-search ATP after the wait period and all participants completed a follow-up assessment six-months after treatment. At post-treatment/wait period, children in the ATP condition showed greater improvements on clinician- and parent-report measures compared to children in the WLC. Similar post-treatment outcomes as those found for the ATP condition were observed at the six-month follow-up after all children had received ATP. Moreover, children who showed greater verbalization of explicit attention strategies related to positive search (assessed during treatment) achieved greater reductions in anxiety severity at post-treatment and six-month follow-up. Attention training towards positive stimuli using enhanced visual-search procedures appears to be a promising treatment for reaching anxious children living in regional communities.
2043-8087
511-527
Waters, Allison
faca9345-cafa-4a70-9419-49a85fbbfde5
Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie
87077cb2-8386-435e-a17f-b801c22e7df2
Craske, Michelle
4634abff-42c0-4ac5-b14f-525c7fb333e0
Pine, Daniel
780d863f-93a6-49bb-a8c1-0a4d22bcc026
Bradley, Brendan P
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30
Waters, Allison
faca9345-cafa-4a70-9419-49a85fbbfde5
Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie
87077cb2-8386-435e-a17f-b801c22e7df2
Craske, Michelle
4634abff-42c0-4ac5-b14f-525c7fb333e0
Pine, Daniel
780d863f-93a6-49bb-a8c1-0a4d22bcc026
Bradley, Brendan P
bdacaa6c-528b-4086-9448-27ebfe463514
Mogg, Karin
5f1474af-85f5-4fd3-8eb6-0371be848e30

Waters, Allison, Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie, Craske, Michelle, Pine, Daniel, Bradley, Brendan P and Mogg, Karin (2016) A preliminary evaluation of a home-based, computer-delivered attention training treatment for anxious children living in regional communities. Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, 7 (3), 511-527. (doi:10.5127/jep.053315).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many children with anxiety disorders live in communities with limited access to treatment. Attention bias modification training, a promising computer-based treatment for anxiety disorders, may provide a readily accessible treatment. Recent evidence suggests that a form of ABMT combining visual-search for positive stimuli with features to enhance learning, memory and treatment engagement reduces anxiety in children. The present study builds upon this research by comparing parent-implemented, visual-search attention training to positive stimuli (ATP) (N = 22) with a waitlist control group (WLC) (N = 19) in children living in regional communities. Diagnostic, parent- and child-reports of anxiety and depressive symptoms and broad internalizing and externalizing behaviour problems were assessed pre- and post-condition. Children in the WLC completed visual-search ATP after the wait period and all participants completed a follow-up assessment six-months after treatment. At post-treatment/wait period, children in the ATP condition showed greater improvements on clinician- and parent-report measures compared to children in the WLC. Similar post-treatment outcomes as those found for the ATP condition were observed at the six-month follow-up after all children had received ATP. Moreover, children who showed greater verbalization of explicit attention strategies related to positive search (assessed during treatment) achieved greater reductions in anxiety severity at post-treatment and six-month follow-up. Attention training towards positive stimuli using enhanced visual-search procedures appears to be a promising treatment for reaching anxious children living in regional communities.

Text
Waters et al 2016 Home-based ABM Training to Positive-1 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 9 June 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 June 2016
Published date: November 2016
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407197
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407197
ISSN: 2043-8087
PURE UUID: ae015798-c51b-41bb-af0c-861df7710453
ORCID for Brendan P Bradley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2801-4271

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Date deposited: 01 Apr 2017 01:05
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:45

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