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Training mental rotation skills to improve spatial ability

Training mental rotation skills to improve spatial ability
Training mental rotation skills to improve spatial ability
Prior research indicates that spatial skills, such as Mental Rotation Skills (MRS), are a strong predictor for mathematics achievement. Other studies have shown that MRS can be instilled through training and that they are a good predictor of another spatial skill: route learning and wayfinding skills. This paper explores these assumptions and reports an experiment with 43 undergraduate psychology students from a university in the south of England. Participants were randomly assigned to two conditions. Both groups were given pre- and post-tests on wayfinding in a maze. The intervention group trained with a MRS tool, based on a standardised MRS task. The control group did filler tasks by completing crossword puzzles. Collectively, the 43 students made 43×48=2064 assessment items for MRS, and 2×43=86 mazes. Although the intervention group showed a decrease in time needed to do the maze task, while the control group saw an increase, these changes were not significant.
Bokhove, Christian
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Redhead, Edward
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Bokhove, Christian
7fc17e5b-9a94-48f3-a387-2ccf60d2d5d8
Redhead, Edward
d2342759-2c77-45ef-ac0f-9f70aa5db0df

Bokhove, Christian and Redhead, Edward (2017) Training mental rotation skills to improve spatial ability. BSRLM Proceedings, 36 (3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Prior research indicates that spatial skills, such as Mental Rotation Skills (MRS), are a strong predictor for mathematics achievement. Other studies have shown that MRS can be instilled through training and that they are a good predictor of another spatial skill: route learning and wayfinding skills. This paper explores these assumptions and reports an experiment with 43 undergraduate psychology students from a university in the south of England. Participants were randomly assigned to two conditions. Both groups were given pre- and post-tests on wayfinding in a maze. The intervention group trained with a MRS tool, based on a standardised MRS task. The control group did filler tasks by completing crossword puzzles. Collectively, the 43 students made 43×48=2064 assessment items for MRS, and 2×43=86 mazes. Although the intervention group showed a decrease in time needed to do the maze task, while the control group saw an increase, these changes were not significant.

Text
BSRLM-CP-36-3-02 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 November 2016
Published date: 27 March 2017
Venue - Dates: British Society for Research into Learning Mathematics Day Conference, Brighton, United Kingdom, 2016-11-12 - 2016-11-12
Organisations: Cognition, Mathematics, Science & Health Education

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407203
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407203
PURE UUID: 8bab5342-fc4a-4d15-9a2d-418b4c935724
ORCID for Christian Bokhove: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4860-8723

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Apr 2017 01:05
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:35

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