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Evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of synthetic Aß42 (AN1792) in patients with AD

Evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of synthetic Aß42 (AN1792) in patients with AD
Evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of synthetic Aß42 (AN1792) in patients with AD
Background: Aß42-immunization reduces plaque burden and improves cognition in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease (AD). This phase 1 study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of AN1792 (human aggregated Aß42) in patients with mild to moderate AD.
Methods: twenty patients were enrolled into each of four dose groups and randomly assigned to receive IM AN1792 (50 or 225 µg) with QS-21 adjuvant (50 or 100 µg) or QS-21 only (control) in a 4:1 active:control ratio on day 0 and at weeks 4, 12, and 24. Patients could receive up to four additional injections of a polysorbate 80 modified formulation at weeks 36, 48, 60, and 72. Safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and exploratory evidence of efficacy were evaluated.
Results: treatment-related adverse events were reported in 19 (23.8%) patients, but no relationship was observed between AN1792 dose and incidence. One patient developed meningoencephalitis that was diagnosed after death (not directly related to study treatment) and 219 days after discontinuing from the study. Five deaths occurred during the study follow-up, but none was considered to be directly related to study treatment. During the period of the first four injections, 23.4% of AN1792-treated patients had a positive anti-AN1792 antibody titer (an anti-AN1792 antibody titer of ?1:1,000). This increased to 58.8% after additional injections with the modified formulation. Disability Assessment for Dementia scores showed less decline among active compared with control patients at week 84 (p = 0.002). No treatment differences were observed in three other efficacy measures.
Conclusions: AN1792 + QS-21 elicited a positive antibody response to Aß42 in more than half of this elderly study population
0028-3878
94-101
Bayer, A.J.
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Bullock, R.
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Jones, R.W.
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Wilkinson, D.
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Paterson, K.R.
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Jenkins, L.
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Millais, S.B.
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Donoghue, S.
df5d41e6-8892-429a-988b-e6909e6ff76b
Bayer, A.J.
bfeea679-76a5-4e0f-85c7-21edf1c0719e
Bullock, R.
4a5d4f01-07af-4c40-89aa-85eb92550f08
Jones, R.W.
2a2cfb72-4282-441a-919e-c01bda4220b7
Wilkinson, D.
917ddca3-1dba-4e3c-8618-4db1f8b11800
Paterson, K.R.
f9f2b74f-057c-4fde-992b-71c7d5bdf153
Jenkins, L.
9e2c7962-d5e7-4824-a9c6-8a40c81b2bc1
Millais, S.B.
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Donoghue, S.
df5d41e6-8892-429a-988b-e6909e6ff76b

Bayer, A.J., Bullock, R., Jones, R.W., Wilkinson, D., Paterson, K.R., Jenkins, L., Millais, S.B. and Donoghue, S. (2005) Evaluation of the safety and immunogenicity of synthetic Aß42 (AN1792) in patients with AD. Neurology, 64 (1), 94-101.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Aß42-immunization reduces plaque burden and improves cognition in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease (AD). This phase 1 study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of AN1792 (human aggregated Aß42) in patients with mild to moderate AD.
Methods: twenty patients were enrolled into each of four dose groups and randomly assigned to receive IM AN1792 (50 or 225 µg) with QS-21 adjuvant (50 or 100 µg) or QS-21 only (control) in a 4:1 active:control ratio on day 0 and at weeks 4, 12, and 24. Patients could receive up to four additional injections of a polysorbate 80 modified formulation at weeks 36, 48, 60, and 72. Safety, tolerability, immunogenicity, and exploratory evidence of efficacy were evaluated.
Results: treatment-related adverse events were reported in 19 (23.8%) patients, but no relationship was observed between AN1792 dose and incidence. One patient developed meningoencephalitis that was diagnosed after death (not directly related to study treatment) and 219 days after discontinuing from the study. Five deaths occurred during the study follow-up, but none was considered to be directly related to study treatment. During the period of the first four injections, 23.4% of AN1792-treated patients had a positive anti-AN1792 antibody titer (an anti-AN1792 antibody titer of ?1:1,000). This increased to 58.8% after additional injections with the modified formulation. Disability Assessment for Dementia scores showed less decline among active compared with control patients at week 84 (p = 0.002). No treatment differences were observed in three other efficacy measures.
Conclusions: AN1792 + QS-21 elicited a positive antibody response to Aß42 in more than half of this elderly study population

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Published date: January 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 40736
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/40736
ISSN: 0028-3878
PURE UUID: 6c4bf3fa-ec24-4119-a262-7c84bb9dd802

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Date deposited: 07 Jul 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:33

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Contributors

Author: A.J. Bayer
Author: R. Bullock
Author: R.W. Jones
Author: D. Wilkinson
Author: K.R. Paterson
Author: L. Jenkins
Author: S.B. Millais
Author: S. Donoghue

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