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The amiras and the Ottoman Empire, 1880-1923: the case of the Gulbenkians

The amiras and the Ottoman Empire, 1880-1923: the case of the Gulbenkians
The amiras and the Ottoman Empire, 1880-1923: the case of the Gulbenkians
The contribution of the amira or merchant elites of the Ottoman Empire to the empire’s development was highly contested in the decades around 1900. Ottoman Armenian amiras dominated imperial finance and international trade, as well as coordinating the introduction of new crops and industrial technologies. Integrating the Empire in a globalized world, however, led to accusations by non-Armenians that the amiras were guilty of condemning that same Empire to a subservient state of clientage, while fellow Ottoman Armenians increasingly viewed the amiras as unpatriotic collaborators. Drawing on a wealth of new archival material from one leading amira clan, this article attempts to move beyond nationalist narratives, revealing the amiras’ multiple identities as the vanguard of a globalizing world.

0082-6847
219-244
Conlin, Jonathan
3ab58a7d-d74b-48d9-99db-1ba2f3aada40
Conlin, Jonathan
3ab58a7d-d74b-48d9-99db-1ba2f3aada40

Conlin, Jonathan (2017) The amiras and the Ottoman Empire, 1880-1923: the case of the Gulbenkians. Turcica, 48, 219-244. (doi:10.2143/TURC.48.0.3237140).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The contribution of the amira or merchant elites of the Ottoman Empire to the empire’s development was highly contested in the decades around 1900. Ottoman Armenian amiras dominated imperial finance and international trade, as well as coordinating the introduction of new crops and industrial technologies. Integrating the Empire in a globalized world, however, led to accusations by non-Armenians that the amiras were guilty of condemning that same Empire to a subservient state of clientage, while fellow Ottoman Armenians increasingly viewed the amiras as unpatriotic collaborators. Drawing on a wealth of new archival material from one leading amira clan, this article attempts to move beyond nationalist narratives, revealing the amiras’ multiple identities as the vanguard of a globalizing world.

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TURCICAGulbenkians - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 September 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 October 2017
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407712
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407712
ISSN: 0082-6847
PURE UUID: 65983bef-1f09-4b57-9462-fe87854a3e1f
ORCID for Jonathan Conlin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0394-4931

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Date deposited: 22 Apr 2017 01:09
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 07:28

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