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Thatcherism, crime and the social and economic ‘storms’ of the 1980s

Thatcherism, crime and the social and economic ‘storms’ of the 1980s
Thatcherism, crime and the social and economic ‘storms’ of the 1980s
Using insights from the classical sociology of deviance and social structure (notably Durkheim and Merton) we explore the enduring impact of the social and economic changes which started in the UK in the early 1980s. In the two subsequent decades the UK went through a period of radical economic restructuring, leading to lasting social change. We seek to gauge the effect of these combined social and economic processes, which we label social and economic ‘storms’, at the national level. In so doing we assess, and ultimately defend, the heuristic utility of this conceptualisation, considering the extent to which such social and economic storms (individually and collectively) weakened bonds between individuals, within and between families, and across communities. We use proxy measures of economic and social changes in combination with recorded crime statistics to explore the degree to which such processes might be associated with victimisation rates. We find that crime was related to these macro-level ‘storms’, although ultimately they were driven by economic variables. Our analyses show how political decision making can shape long-term trends in crime rates.
2059-1098
220-243
Farrall, Stephen
0d3eef36-9966-4bac-85f9-4fd867dc2088
Jennings, William
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Gray, Emily
51d23466-272b-4ba0-aeb2-d374f91fcf44
Hay, Colin
b0c68006-e341-4c28-ab2a-33a3cba5c726
Farrall, Stephen
0d3eef36-9966-4bac-85f9-4fd867dc2088
Jennings, William
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Gray, Emily
51d23466-272b-4ba0-aeb2-d374f91fcf44
Hay, Colin
b0c68006-e341-4c28-ab2a-33a3cba5c726

Farrall, Stephen, Jennings, William, Gray, Emily and Hay, Colin (2017) Thatcherism, crime and the social and economic ‘storms’ of the 1980s. The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 56 (2), 220-243. (doi:10.1111/hojo.12202).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Using insights from the classical sociology of deviance and social structure (notably Durkheim and Merton) we explore the enduring impact of the social and economic changes which started in the UK in the early 1980s. In the two subsequent decades the UK went through a period of radical economic restructuring, leading to lasting social change. We seek to gauge the effect of these combined social and economic processes, which we label social and economic ‘storms’, at the national level. In so doing we assess, and ultimately defend, the heuristic utility of this conceptualisation, considering the extent to which such social and economic storms (individually and collectively) weakened bonds between individuals, within and between families, and across communities. We use proxy measures of economic and social changes in combination with recorded crime statistics to explore the degree to which such processes might be associated with victimisation rates. We find that crime was related to these macro-level ‘storms’, although ultimately they were driven by economic variables. Our analyses show how political decision making can shape long-term trends in crime rates.

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Farrall et al_ final ACCEPTED VERSION (APRIL 2017) - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 27 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 May 2017
Published date: June 2017
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407728
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407728
ISSN: 2059-1098
PURE UUID: c5e5c3fa-572c-4c2e-a2c4-6c3b1eb2a4a2
ORCID for William Jennings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9007-8896

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Date deposited: 25 Apr 2017 01:02
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 04:15

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Contributors

Author: Stephen Farrall
Author: Emily Gray
Author: Colin Hay

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