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Similar damage initiation but different failure behavior in trabecular and cortical bone tissue

Similar damage initiation but different failure behavior in trabecular and cortical bone tissue
Similar damage initiation but different failure behavior in trabecular and cortical bone tissue
The mechanical properties of bone tissue are reflected in its micro- and nanostructure as well as in its composition. Numerous studies have compared the elastic mechanical properties of cortical and trabecular bone tissue and concluded that cortical bone tissue is stiffer than trabecular bone tissue. This study compared the progression of microdamage leading to fracture and the related local strains during this process in trabecular and cortical bone tissue. Unmachined single bovine trabeculae and similarly-sized cortical bovine bone samples were mechanically tested in three-point bending and concomitantly imaged to assess local strains using a digital image correlation technique. The bone whitening effect was used to detect microdamage formation and propagation. This study found that cortical bone tissue exhibits significantly lower maximum strains (trabecular 36.6%±14% vs. cortical 22.9%±7.4%) and less accumulated damage (trabecular 16100±8800 pix/mm 2 vs. cortical 8000±3400 pix/mm 2) at failure. However, no difference was detected for the maximum local strain at whitening onset (trabecular 5.8%±2.6% vs. cortical 7.2%±3.1%). The differences in elastic modulus and mineral distribution in the two tissues were investigated, using nanoindentation and micro-Raman imaging, to explain the different mechanical properties found. While cortical bone was found to be overall stiffer and more highly mineralized, no apparent differences were noted in the distribution of modulus values or mineral density along the specimen diameter. Therefore, differences in the mechanical behavior of trabecular and cortical bone tissue are likely to be in large part due to microstructural (i.e. orientation and distribution of cement lines) and collagen related compositional differences. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Cortical, Microdamage, Strain, Three-point bending, Trabeculae
1751-6161
1787-1796
Szabó, M. E.
500bf0a1-a11c-4b1f-a04a-fbee44ac8d97
Zekonyte, J.
c40df725-5ce3-4692-b638-bbb4d847b5ea
Katsamenis, O.L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Taylor, M.
c416c3ad-c253-4a84-82f0-cd81c246fc4d
Thurner, P. J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f
Szabó, M. E.
500bf0a1-a11c-4b1f-a04a-fbee44ac8d97
Zekonyte, J.
c40df725-5ce3-4692-b638-bbb4d847b5ea
Katsamenis, O.L.
8553e7c3-d860-4b7a-a883-abf6c0c4b438
Taylor, M.
c416c3ad-c253-4a84-82f0-cd81c246fc4d
Thurner, P. J.
ab711ddd-784e-48de-aaad-f56aec40f84f

Szabó, M. E., Zekonyte, J., Katsamenis, O.L., Taylor, M. and Thurner, P. J. (2011) Similar damage initiation but different failure behavior in trabecular and cortical bone tissue. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, 4 (8), 1787-1796. (doi:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2011.05.036).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The mechanical properties of bone tissue are reflected in its micro- and nanostructure as well as in its composition. Numerous studies have compared the elastic mechanical properties of cortical and trabecular bone tissue and concluded that cortical bone tissue is stiffer than trabecular bone tissue. This study compared the progression of microdamage leading to fracture and the related local strains during this process in trabecular and cortical bone tissue. Unmachined single bovine trabeculae and similarly-sized cortical bovine bone samples were mechanically tested in three-point bending and concomitantly imaged to assess local strains using a digital image correlation technique. The bone whitening effect was used to detect microdamage formation and propagation. This study found that cortical bone tissue exhibits significantly lower maximum strains (trabecular 36.6%±14% vs. cortical 22.9%±7.4%) and less accumulated damage (trabecular 16100±8800 pix/mm 2 vs. cortical 8000±3400 pix/mm 2) at failure. However, no difference was detected for the maximum local strain at whitening onset (trabecular 5.8%±2.6% vs. cortical 7.2%±3.1%). The differences in elastic modulus and mineral distribution in the two tissues were investigated, using nanoindentation and micro-Raman imaging, to explain the different mechanical properties found. While cortical bone was found to be overall stiffer and more highly mineralized, no apparent differences were noted in the distribution of modulus values or mineral density along the specimen diameter. Therefore, differences in the mechanical behavior of trabecular and cortical bone tissue are likely to be in large part due to microstructural (i.e. orientation and distribution of cement lines) and collagen related compositional differences. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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More information

Published date: November 2011
Keywords: Cortical, Microdamage, Strain, Three-point bending, Trabeculae
Organisations: Bioengineering Group, nCATS Group, Engineering Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407862
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407862
ISSN: 1751-6161
PURE UUID: 08f19579-ac4b-4187-83c1-4e63c20478a7
ORCID for O.L. Katsamenis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4367-4147
ORCID for P. J. Thurner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7588-9041

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Date deposited: 27 Apr 2017 01:08
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:44

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Contributors

Author: M. E. Szabó
Author: J. Zekonyte
Author: O.L. Katsamenis ORCID iD
Author: M. Taylor
Author: P. J. Thurner ORCID iD

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