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Fusion bead procedure for nuclear forensics employing synthetic enstatite to dissolve uraniferous and other challenging materials prior to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

Fusion bead procedure for nuclear forensics employing synthetic enstatite to dissolve uraniferous and other challenging materials prior to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Fusion bead procedure for nuclear forensics employing synthetic enstatite to dissolve uraniferous and other challenging materials prior to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
There is an increasing demand for rapid and effective analytical tools to support nuclear forensic investigations of seized or suspect materials. Some methods are simply adapted from other scientific disciplines and can effectively be used to rapidly prepare complex materials for subsequent analysis. A novel sample fusion method is developed, tested, and validated to produce homogeneous, flux-free glass beads of geochemical reference materials (GRMs), uranium ores, and uranium ore concentrates (UOC) prior to the analysis of 14 rare earth elements (REE) via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The novelty of the procedure is the production of glass beads using 9 parts high purity synthetic enstatite (MgSiO3) as the glass former with 1 part of sample (sample mass ∼1.5 mg). The beads are rapidly prepared (∼10 min overall time) by fusing the blended mixture on an iridium strip resistance heater in an argon-purged chamber. Many elements can be measured in the glass bead, but the rare earth group in particular is a valuable series in nuclear forensic studies and is well-determined using LA-ICP-MS. The REE data obtained from the GRMs, presented as chondrite normalized patterns, are in very good agreement with consensus patterns. The UOCs have comparable patterns to solution ICP-MS methods and published data. The attractions of the current development are its conservation of sample, speed of preparation, and suitability for microbeam analysis, all of which are favorable for nuclear forensics practitioners and geochemists requiring REE patterns from scarce or valuable samples.
0003-2700
6007-6015
Reading, David G.
e875ad0e-0316-469b-9e82-f93f48ef4734
Croudace, Ian W.
24deb068-d096-485e-8a23-a32b7a68afaf
Warwick, Phillip E.
f2675d83-eee2-40c5-b53d-fbe437f401ef
Reading, David G.
e875ad0e-0316-469b-9e82-f93f48ef4734
Croudace, Ian W.
24deb068-d096-485e-8a23-a32b7a68afaf
Warwick, Phillip E.
f2675d83-eee2-40c5-b53d-fbe437f401ef

Reading, David G., Croudace, Ian W. and Warwick, Phillip E. (2017) Fusion bead procedure for nuclear forensics employing synthetic enstatite to dissolve uraniferous and other challenging materials prior to laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Analytical Chemistry, 89 (11), 6007-6015. (doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.7b00558).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is an increasing demand for rapid and effective analytical tools to support nuclear forensic investigations of seized or suspect materials. Some methods are simply adapted from other scientific disciplines and can effectively be used to rapidly prepare complex materials for subsequent analysis. A novel sample fusion method is developed, tested, and validated to produce homogeneous, flux-free glass beads of geochemical reference materials (GRMs), uranium ores, and uranium ore concentrates (UOC) prior to the analysis of 14 rare earth elements (REE) via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The novelty of the procedure is the production of glass beads using 9 parts high purity synthetic enstatite (MgSiO3) as the glass former with 1 part of sample (sample mass ∼1.5 mg). The beads are rapidly prepared (∼10 min overall time) by fusing the blended mixture on an iridium strip resistance heater in an argon-purged chamber. Many elements can be measured in the glass bead, but the rare earth group in particular is a valuable series in nuclear forensic studies and is well-determined using LA-ICP-MS. The REE data obtained from the GRMs, presented as chondrite normalized patterns, are in very good agreement with consensus patterns. The UOCs have comparable patterns to solution ICP-MS methods and published data. The attractions of the current development are its conservation of sample, speed of preparation, and suitability for microbeam analysis, all of which are favorable for nuclear forensics practitioners and geochemists requiring REE patterns from scarce or valuable samples.

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Reading et al 2017 - Just accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 May 2017
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Geochemistry

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 407937
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/407937
ISSN: 0003-2700
PURE UUID: 52ceb7be-8d86-489d-b095-636476dc7268
ORCID for David G. Reading: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6697-8525

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 May 2017 01:02
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 06:00

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