The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Intergenerational change in anthropometric indices and their predictors among children in New Delhi Birth Cohort

Intergenerational change in anthropometric indices and their predictors among children in New Delhi Birth Cohort
Intergenerational change in anthropometric indices and their predictors among children in New Delhi Birth Cohort
Objective: to evaluate intergenerational change in anthropometric indices of children and their predictors.

Design: prospective cohort

Participants: New Delhi Birth Cohort participants (F1), born between 1969 and 1972, were followed-up for anthropometry at birth and 6-monthly intervals until 21 years. Their children (F2) below 10 years were evaluated anthropometrically.

Outcome measure: intergenerational change (F2-F1) in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) of children in comparison to their parents at corresponding ages.

Results: 432 F2-F1 pairs were analyzed in age-groups of 0-5 (26.9%) and 5-10 (73.1%) years. Children were considerably taller (0-5 years 0.99 SD; 5-10 years 1.17 SD) and heavier (0-5 years 0.77 SD; 5-10 years 1.52 SD) while only those aged 5-10 years were broader (had a higher BMI; 1.03 SD), than their parents. These increases for 0-5 and 5-10 years, respectively corresponded to 3.9 and 6.4 cm for height, 1.3 and 5.4 kg for weight and 0.2 and 1.9 kg/m2 for BMI. Lower parents’ anthropometric indices and poor water supply and sanitation facilities; higher age of parents at child birth and of children when measured (for height and weight); and more parental education (for weight and BMI), were associated with greater intergenerational gains in children.

Conclusion: over one generation in an urban middle-class population, whose general living conditions had improved, underfive children have become considerably taller and heavier, and 5- 10 year old children have additionally become broader, than their parents at corresponding ages. Child populations probably ‘grow up’ before ‘growing out’.
0019-6061
185-192
Sinha, S.
0b9b3dec-acfd-48af-ac01-88a6c389097d
Aggarwal, A.R
cded8c45-ad98-4ce4-928b-dc96dd02a511
Osmond, Clive
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49
Sachdev, H. P.
fb1b2723-48bc-469c-9cab-ae966c42b3ed
Sinha, S.
0b9b3dec-acfd-48af-ac01-88a6c389097d
Aggarwal, A.R
cded8c45-ad98-4ce4-928b-dc96dd02a511
Osmond, Clive
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Fall, Caroline
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Bhargava, S.K.
aaa4d65d-aa8b-463d-8dd2-51a9b8516f49
Sachdev, H. P.
fb1b2723-48bc-469c-9cab-ae966c42b3ed

Sinha, S., Aggarwal, A.R, Osmond, Clive, Fall, Caroline, Bhargava, S.K. and Sachdev, H. P. (2016) Intergenerational change in anthropometric indices and their predictors among children in New Delhi Birth Cohort. Indian pediatrics, 54 (3), 185-192. (doi:10.1007/s13312-017-1028-z).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: to evaluate intergenerational change in anthropometric indices of children and their predictors.

Design: prospective cohort

Participants: New Delhi Birth Cohort participants (F1), born between 1969 and 1972, were followed-up for anthropometry at birth and 6-monthly intervals until 21 years. Their children (F2) below 10 years were evaluated anthropometrically.

Outcome measure: intergenerational change (F2-F1) in height, weight and body mass index (BMI) of children in comparison to their parents at corresponding ages.

Results: 432 F2-F1 pairs were analyzed in age-groups of 0-5 (26.9%) and 5-10 (73.1%) years. Children were considerably taller (0-5 years 0.99 SD; 5-10 years 1.17 SD) and heavier (0-5 years 0.77 SD; 5-10 years 1.52 SD) while only those aged 5-10 years were broader (had a higher BMI; 1.03 SD), than their parents. These increases for 0-5 and 5-10 years, respectively corresponded to 3.9 and 6.4 cm for height, 1.3 and 5.4 kg for weight and 0.2 and 1.9 kg/m2 for BMI. Lower parents’ anthropometric indices and poor water supply and sanitation facilities; higher age of parents at child birth and of children when measured (for height and weight); and more parental education (for weight and BMI), were associated with greater intergenerational gains in children.

Conclusion: over one generation in an urban middle-class population, whose general living conditions had improved, underfive children have become considerably taller and heavier, and 5- 10 year old children have additionally become broader, than their parents at corresponding ages. Child populations probably ‘grow up’ before ‘growing out’.

Text
Intergenerational draft Revision Clean 06102016 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (412kB)
Text
Figure 1
Download (31kB)
Text
Figure 2
Download (39kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 November 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 5 December 2016
Organisations: Human Development & Health, Medical Research Council

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408199
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408199
ISSN: 0019-6061
PURE UUID: 18ea3439-2cc5-4147-bb87-bb121bd5ea06
ORCID for Clive Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655
ORCID for Caroline Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2017 04:01
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:45

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×