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Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia

Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia
Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia
Ombrotrophic raised bogs are nutrient poor acidic peatlands accumulating organic matter. They are widely spread on northern latitudes and are substantial sources of methane emissions to the atmosphere being of great concern from a climate change perspective. We investigated the methanogen community composition along microtopographic gradients within three bogs in Scandinavia, receiving different amounts of nitrogen precipitation. Methanogenic community analyses by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the mcrA gene showed different profiles among the three sites, while no influence of the microtopographic gradients was observed. Peat temperature and dissolved organic carbon were the major edaphic variables explaining 38% of the variation of the methanogenic community diversity among the bogs. The family Methanoregulaceae (hydrogenotrophic methanogens) showed the largest relative proportion and highest activity in all three sites. Quantitative PCR of the mcrA gene and transcripts showed that the most northern site, receiving the lowest atmospheric nitrogen load, had significantly lower abundance and activity of methanogens (4.7 × 106 and 2.4 × 104mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), compared to the most southern site (8.2 × 107 and 4.6 × 105mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), receiving the highest nitrogen load. No patterns of the mcrA gene and transcript abundances were observed along the microtopography. The results indicated that the difference in occurrence of methanogens is mainly due to geoclimatological conditions rather than site intrinsic microtopographic variation. The study further suggests that environmental changes on the site intrinsic topography will not affect the methanogenic activity, while increasing average temperatures in Scandinavian ombrotrophic raised bogs might contribute to an increase of the methanogenic archaeal activity resulting in an increase of methane production.
Methanogenic archaea, mcrA gene, Peatland, Microtopography, T-RFLP, qPCR
0038-0717
204-211
Marti, Magali
d19d641b-a984-4a55-884a-b092c5d43fda
Juottonen, Heli
10993192-8076-45af-9af6-f235ce626075
Robroek, Bjorn J. M.
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Yrjala, Kim
cebfb9ac-2807-42bf-ba55-e934fba12c29
Danielsson, Asa
51059424-6306-407e-b8ab-1ea502ee6693
Lindgren, Per-Eric
794099eb-c6f6-4fab-8232-e15841c01878
Svensson, Bo H.
329275aa-e585-435b-b716-62ce37536ef0
Marti, Magali
d19d641b-a984-4a55-884a-b092c5d43fda
Juottonen, Heli
10993192-8076-45af-9af6-f235ce626075
Robroek, Bjorn J. M.
06dcb269-687c-41db-ab73-f61899617f92
Yrjala, Kim
cebfb9ac-2807-42bf-ba55-e934fba12c29
Danielsson, Asa
51059424-6306-407e-b8ab-1ea502ee6693
Lindgren, Per-Eric
794099eb-c6f6-4fab-8232-e15841c01878
Svensson, Bo H.
329275aa-e585-435b-b716-62ce37536ef0

Marti, Magali, Juottonen, Heli, Robroek, Bjorn J. M., Yrjala, Kim, Danielsson, Asa, Lindgren, Per-Eric and Svensson, Bo H. (2015) Nitrogen and methanogen community composition within and among three Sphagnum dominated peatlands in Scandinavia. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 81, 204-211. (doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2014.11.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ombrotrophic raised bogs are nutrient poor acidic peatlands accumulating organic matter. They are widely spread on northern latitudes and are substantial sources of methane emissions to the atmosphere being of great concern from a climate change perspective. We investigated the methanogen community composition along microtopographic gradients within three bogs in Scandinavia, receiving different amounts of nitrogen precipitation. Methanogenic community analyses by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of the mcrA gene showed different profiles among the three sites, while no influence of the microtopographic gradients was observed. Peat temperature and dissolved organic carbon were the major edaphic variables explaining 38% of the variation of the methanogenic community diversity among the bogs. The family Methanoregulaceae (hydrogenotrophic methanogens) showed the largest relative proportion and highest activity in all three sites. Quantitative PCR of the mcrA gene and transcripts showed that the most northern site, receiving the lowest atmospheric nitrogen load, had significantly lower abundance and activity of methanogens (4.7 × 106 and 2.4 × 104mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), compared to the most southern site (8.2 × 107 and 4.6 × 105mcrA copies per gram of soil, respectively), receiving the highest nitrogen load. No patterns of the mcrA gene and transcript abundances were observed along the microtopography. The results indicated that the difference in occurrence of methanogens is mainly due to geoclimatological conditions rather than site intrinsic microtopographic variation. The study further suggests that environmental changes on the site intrinsic topography will not affect the methanogenic activity, while increasing average temperatures in Scandinavian ombrotrophic raised bogs might contribute to an increase of the methanogenic archaeal activity resulting in an increase of methane production.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 November 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 November 2014
Published date: February 2015
Keywords: Methanogenic archaea, mcrA gene, Peatland, Microtopography, T-RFLP, qPCR
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408490
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408490
ISSN: 0038-0717
PURE UUID: cbc7c80a-cba3-4b39-9524-d67975f3071c
ORCID for Bjorn J. M. Robroek: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6714-0652

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 May 2017 04:05
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:27

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