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Joan of Arc as prisonnière de guerre

Joan of Arc as prisonnière de guerre
Joan of Arc as prisonnière de guerre
Contrary to what has been previously claimed, the birth of the French term prisonnier de guerre dates back to long before the early seventeenth century. The corpus of documents which form the foundation of this article includes some sixty occurrences of the term (in French or Latin) over a period of more than a century, the earliest dating to 1357. In contrast with previous studies on the status of prisoners of war which have tended to rely on a modern conception of the term, this present investigation focuses on contemporary perceptions of those who were designated prisonniers de guerre in the later middle ages. The significance of this discussion is demonstrated in particular through the case of Joan of Arc, who, perhaps surprisingly, was considered a prisonnière de guerre by the English. In her case – which was by no means an exception to the general rule – the status of prisonnier de guerre derived from the property rights which her ‘master’ (or captor) enjoyed over her. It did not involve any protection of the prisoner her (or him) self. Contemporary debates around the status of prisonniers de guerre, when such questions were raised, were focused on the rights of the master. Perhaps is it more appropriate not to speak of the status prisoner of war but rather the status of the master of the prisoner of war.
0013-8266
1045-1076
Ambuhl, Remy
32df8780-6465-4f04-b366-55faede4730d
Ambuhl, Remy
32df8780-6465-4f04-b366-55faede4730d

Ambuhl, Remy (2017) Joan of Arc as prisonnière de guerre. English Historical Review, 132 (558), 1045-1076. (doi:10.1093/ehr/cex347).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Contrary to what has been previously claimed, the birth of the French term prisonnier de guerre dates back to long before the early seventeenth century. The corpus of documents which form the foundation of this article includes some sixty occurrences of the term (in French or Latin) over a period of more than a century, the earliest dating to 1357. In contrast with previous studies on the status of prisoners of war which have tended to rely on a modern conception of the term, this present investigation focuses on contemporary perceptions of those who were designated prisonniers de guerre in the later middle ages. The significance of this discussion is demonstrated in particular through the case of Joan of Arc, who, perhaps surprisingly, was considered a prisonnière de guerre by the English. In her case – which was by no means an exception to the general rule – the status of prisonnier de guerre derived from the property rights which her ‘master’ (or captor) enjoyed over her. It did not involve any protection of the prisoner her (or him) self. Contemporary debates around the status of prisonniers de guerre, when such questions were raised, were focused on the rights of the master. Perhaps is it more appropriate not to speak of the status prisoner of war but rather the status of the master of the prisoner of war.

Text SUB Joan of Arc as 'prisonniere de guerre' (10-01-2016) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 14 May 2019.
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Accepted/In Press date: 18 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 December 2017
Published date: 14 December 2017
Organisations: History

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408521
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408521
ISSN: 0013-8266
PURE UUID: f0f6880d-e467-4502-91a2-a1d64330eff1

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Date deposited: 23 May 2017 04:01
Last modified: 23 Jan 2018 17:31

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Author: Remy Ambuhl

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