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Effects of duration and vibration on performance of a continuous manual control task

Effects of duration and vibration on performance of a continuous manual control task
Effects of duration and vibration on performance of a continuous manual control task

An experiment is described in which two independent groups of seated subjects performed a pursuit tracking task for 202·5 min on two separate occasions. For one group, the total duration included 180 min exposure to vertical z-axis, whole-body random vibration with a bandwidth of 1 octave centred on 4 Hz. The weighted acceleration magnitude was 1·4 ms−2 r. m. s., with a crest factor of 4·13. Using the procedures denned in British Standard 6841 (BSI 1987), the motion had a vibration dose value of 20 ms−1·75. The other group received no vibration exposure. Results showed that performance declined as function of duration, but that vibration exposure did not impair performance or interact with the effect of duration. Performance in the second sessions showed less effect of duration than in the first session. The effect of duration was associated with change in both linear and non-linear tracking behaviour. Closed loop system transfer functions showed both reduced moduli and increased phase lags with increasing exposure duration.

Duration, Performance, Vibration
0014-0139
645-659
McLeod, R.W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
McLeod, R.W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

McLeod, R.W. and Griffin, M.J. (1993) Effects of duration and vibration on performance of a continuous manual control task. Ergonomics, 36 (6), 645-659. (doi:10.1080/00140139308967926).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An experiment is described in which two independent groups of seated subjects performed a pursuit tracking task for 202·5 min on two separate occasions. For one group, the total duration included 180 min exposure to vertical z-axis, whole-body random vibration with a bandwidth of 1 octave centred on 4 Hz. The weighted acceleration magnitude was 1·4 ms−2 r. m. s., with a crest factor of 4·13. Using the procedures denned in British Standard 6841 (BSI 1987), the motion had a vibration dose value of 20 ms−1·75. The other group received no vibration exposure. Results showed that performance declined as function of duration, but that vibration exposure did not impair performance or interact with the effect of duration. Performance in the second sessions showed less effect of duration than in the first session. The effect of duration was associated with change in both linear and non-linear tracking behaviour. Closed loop system transfer functions showed both reduced moduli and increased phase lags with increasing exposure duration.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 November 1991
Published date: 1993
Keywords: Duration, Performance, Vibration
Organisations: Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408567
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408567
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: 74a18111-5f50-4627-99e8-f6196b1686b8
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 23 May 2017 04:03
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

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Contributors

Author: R.W. McLeod
Author: M.J. Griffin ORCID iD

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