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Towards the standardization of a testing method for the end-stop impacts of suspension seats

Towards the standardization of a testing method for the end-stop impacts of suspension seats
Towards the standardization of a testing method for the end-stop impacts of suspension seats

Standard tests of the vibration isolation efficiency of suspension seats currently use narrow-band input spectra representing the motions of specific vehicles. The motions used in these tests have near-Gaussian amplitude distributions, whereas vehicle motions include occasional extreme movements causing end-stop impacts of the seat suspension which increase the exposure of the seat occupant to vibration and shock. Tests have been conducted with various vibration magnitudes so as to quantify suspension seat isolation efficiency in terms of the ratios of the vibration dose values (VDVs) at the base of the seat, above the seat suspension and above the seat cushion. It is shown that the vibration response of a seat suspension occurs in five stages according to the magnitude of the input vibration, and that the cushion of a suspension seat may reduce the severity of severe end-stop impacts. The dynamic performance of a suspension seat when supporting a human subject and when supporting a sand bag is compared and the effect of mid-position adjustment is demonstrated. The form of an end-stop impact test which could supplement existing tests so as to evaluate the overall performance of suspension seats is discussed.

0022-460X
307-319
Wu, X.
bb3a0609-dae5-4ba5-b650-86b064f7771d
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Wu, X.
bb3a0609-dae5-4ba5-b650-86b064f7771d
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Wu, X. and Griffin, M.J. (1996) Towards the standardization of a testing method for the end-stop impacts of suspension seats. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 192 (1), 307-319. (doi:10.1006/jsvi.1996.0189).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Standard tests of the vibration isolation efficiency of suspension seats currently use narrow-band input spectra representing the motions of specific vehicles. The motions used in these tests have near-Gaussian amplitude distributions, whereas vehicle motions include occasional extreme movements causing end-stop impacts of the seat suspension which increase the exposure of the seat occupant to vibration and shock. Tests have been conducted with various vibration magnitudes so as to quantify suspension seat isolation efficiency in terms of the ratios of the vibration dose values (VDVs) at the base of the seat, above the seat suspension and above the seat cushion. It is shown that the vibration response of a seat suspension occurs in five stages according to the magnitude of the input vibration, and that the cushion of a suspension seat may reduce the severity of severe end-stop impacts. The dynamic performance of a suspension seat when supporting a human subject and when supporting a sand bag is compared and the effect of mid-position adjustment is demonstrated. The form of an end-stop impact test which could supplement existing tests so as to evaluate the overall performance of suspension seats is discussed.

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More information

Published date: 25 April 1996
Organisations: University of Southampton, Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 408573
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/408573
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 314f3688-c1f5-4afd-9ac2-a4b716a095a2
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 23 May 2017 04:03
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:59

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