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Haemodynamic changes in ipsilateral and contralateral fingers caused by acute exposures to hand transmitted vibration

Haemodynamic changes in ipsilateral and contralateral fingers caused by acute exposures to hand transmitted vibration
Haemodynamic changes in ipsilateral and contralateral fingers caused by acute exposures to hand transmitted vibration

Objectives - To investigate changes in digital circulation during and after exposure to hand transmitted vibration. By studying two frequencies and two magnitudes of vibration, to investigate the extent to which haemodynamic changes depend on the vibration frequency, the vibration acceleration, and the vibration velocity. Methods - Finger skin temperature (FST), finger blood flow (FBF), and finger systolic pressure were measured in the lingers of both hands in eight healthy men. Indices of digital vasomotor tone-such as critical closing pressure and vascular resistance-were estimated by pressure- flow curves obtained with different hand heights. With a static load of 10 N, the right hand was exposed for 30 minutes to each of the following root mean squared (rms) acceleration magnitudes and frequencies of vertical vibration: 22 m.s-2 at 31.5 Hz, 22 m.s-2 at 125 Hz, and 87 m.s-2 at 125 Hz. A control condition consisted of exposure to the static load only. The measures of digital circulation and vasomotor tone were taken before exposure to the vibration and the static load, and at 0, 20, 40, and 60 minutes after the end of each exposure. Results - Exposure to static load caused no significant changes in FST, FBF, or indices of vasomotor tone in either the vibrated right middle finger or the non-vibrated left middle linger. In both fingers, exposure to vibration of 125 Hz and 22 m.s-2 produced a greater reduction in FBF and a greater increase in vasomotor tone than did vibration of 31.5 Hz and 22 m.s-2. In the vibrated right linger, exposure to vibration of 125 Hz and 87 m.s-2 provoked an immediate vasodilation which was followed by vasoconstriction during recovery. The non-vibrated left linger showed a significant increase in vasomotor tone throughout the 60 minute period after the end of vibration exposure. Conclusions - The digital circulatory response to acute vibration depends upon the magnitude and frequency of the vibration stimulus. Vasomotor mechanisms, mediated both centrally and locally, are involved in the reaction of digital vessels to acute vibration. The pattern of the haemodynamic changes in the lingers exposed to the vibration frequencies used in this study do not seem to support the frequency weighting assumed in the current international standard ISO 5349.

Digital vasomotor tone, Vibration frequency, Vibration magnitude
1351-0711
566-576
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Bovenzi, Massimo and Griffin, Michael J. (1997) Haemodynamic changes in ipsilateral and contralateral fingers caused by acute exposures to hand transmitted vibration. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 54 (8), 566-576.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives - To investigate changes in digital circulation during and after exposure to hand transmitted vibration. By studying two frequencies and two magnitudes of vibration, to investigate the extent to which haemodynamic changes depend on the vibration frequency, the vibration acceleration, and the vibration velocity. Methods - Finger skin temperature (FST), finger blood flow (FBF), and finger systolic pressure were measured in the lingers of both hands in eight healthy men. Indices of digital vasomotor tone-such as critical closing pressure and vascular resistance-were estimated by pressure- flow curves obtained with different hand heights. With a static load of 10 N, the right hand was exposed for 30 minutes to each of the following root mean squared (rms) acceleration magnitudes and frequencies of vertical vibration: 22 m.s-2 at 31.5 Hz, 22 m.s-2 at 125 Hz, and 87 m.s-2 at 125 Hz. A control condition consisted of exposure to the static load only. The measures of digital circulation and vasomotor tone were taken before exposure to the vibration and the static load, and at 0, 20, 40, and 60 minutes after the end of each exposure. Results - Exposure to static load caused no significant changes in FST, FBF, or indices of vasomotor tone in either the vibrated right middle finger or the non-vibrated left middle linger. In both fingers, exposure to vibration of 125 Hz and 22 m.s-2 produced a greater reduction in FBF and a greater increase in vasomotor tone than did vibration of 31.5 Hz and 22 m.s-2. In the vibrated right linger, exposure to vibration of 125 Hz and 87 m.s-2 provoked an immediate vasodilation which was followed by vasoconstriction during recovery. The non-vibrated left linger showed a significant increase in vasomotor tone throughout the 60 minute period after the end of vibration exposure. Conclusions - The digital circulatory response to acute vibration depends upon the magnitude and frequency of the vibration stimulus. Vasomotor mechanisms, mediated both centrally and locally, are involved in the reaction of digital vessels to acute vibration. The pattern of the haemodynamic changes in the lingers exposed to the vibration frequencies used in this study do not seem to support the frequency weighting assumed in the current international standard ISO 5349.

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More information

Published date: 1997
Keywords: Digital vasomotor tone, Vibration frequency, Vibration magnitude
Organisations: University of Southampton, Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 409567
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/409567
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 6187e32a-93a0-414d-bc76-f577d76565b1
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 May 2017 04:09
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:27

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Contributors

Author: Massimo Bovenzi

University divisions

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