The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Occurrence and average behavior of pulsating aurora

Occurrence and average behavior of pulsating aurora
Occurrence and average behavior of pulsating aurora
Motivated by recent event studies and modeling efforts on pulsating aurora, which conclude that the precipitation energy during these events is high enough to cause significant chemical changes in the mesosphere, this study looks for the bulk behavior of auroral pulsations. Based on about 400 pulsating aurora events, we outline the typical duration, geomagnetic conditions, and change in the peak emission height for the events. We show that the auroral peak emission height for both green and blue emission decreases by about 8 km at the start of the pulsating aurora interval. This brings the hardest 10% of the electrons down to about 90 km altitude. The median duration of pulsating aurora is about 1.4 h. This value is a conservative estimate since in many cases the end of event is limited by the end of auroral imaging for the night or the aurora drifting out of the camera field of view. The longest durations of auroral pulsations are observed during events which start within the substorm recovery phases. As a result, the geomagnetic indices are not able to describe pulsating aurora. Simultaneous Antarctic auroral images were found for 10 pulsating aurora events. In eight cases auroral pulsations were seen in the southern hemispheric data as well, suggesting an equatorial precipitation source and a frequent interhemispheric occurrence. The long lifetimes of pulsating aurora, their interhemispheric occurrence, and the relatively high-precipitation energies make this type of aurora an effective energy deposition process which is easy to identify from the ground-based image data.
0148-0227
Partamies, N.
7219021b-a268-41eb-8e75-80550b7cf78f
Whiter, D.
9a30d7b6-ea41-44fb-bd52-3ff1964eca5c
Kadokura, A.
98c3ba7e-656b-4c08-8f41-08134a490234
Kauristie, K.
6c818f17-8fe5-4911-9c62-055ae136d88d
Nesse Tyssøy, H.
270ca0e8-4e30-4259-9d3d-9a2277b431ff
Massetti, S.
32e665b3-2bc2-43c4-a23d-498ada2d0240
Stauning, P.
4033507d-6b77-48a6-a79e-caa76d618689
Raita, Tero
c4b131a7-d4c6-409e-a595-b7c239da3c50
Partamies, N.
7219021b-a268-41eb-8e75-80550b7cf78f
Whiter, D.
9a30d7b6-ea41-44fb-bd52-3ff1964eca5c
Kadokura, A.
98c3ba7e-656b-4c08-8f41-08134a490234
Kauristie, K.
6c818f17-8fe5-4911-9c62-055ae136d88d
Nesse Tyssøy, H.
270ca0e8-4e30-4259-9d3d-9a2277b431ff
Massetti, S.
32e665b3-2bc2-43c4-a23d-498ada2d0240
Stauning, P.
4033507d-6b77-48a6-a79e-caa76d618689
Raita, Tero
c4b131a7-d4c6-409e-a595-b7c239da3c50

Partamies, N., Whiter, D., Kadokura, A., Kauristie, K., Nesse Tyssøy, H., Massetti, S., Stauning, P. and Raita, Tero (2017) Occurrence and average behavior of pulsating aurora Journal of Geophysical Research (doi:10.1002/2017JA024039).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Motivated by recent event studies and modeling efforts on pulsating aurora, which conclude that the precipitation energy during these events is high enough to cause significant chemical changes in the mesosphere, this study looks for the bulk behavior of auroral pulsations. Based on about 400 pulsating aurora events, we outline the typical duration, geomagnetic conditions, and change in the peak emission height for the events. We show that the auroral peak emission height for both green and blue emission decreases by about 8 km at the start of the pulsating aurora interval. This brings the hardest 10% of the electrons down to about 90 km altitude. The median duration of pulsating aurora is about 1.4 h. This value is a conservative estimate since in many cases the end of event is limited by the end of auroral imaging for the night or the aurora drifting out of the camera field of view. The longest durations of auroral pulsations are observed during events which start within the substorm recovery phases. As a result, the geomagnetic indices are not able to describe pulsating aurora. Simultaneous Antarctic auroral images were found for 10 pulsating aurora events. In eight cases auroral pulsations were seen in the southern hemispheric data as well, suggesting an equatorial precipitation source and a frequent interhemispheric occurrence. The long lifetimes of pulsating aurora, their interhemispheric occurrence, and the relatively high-precipitation energies make this type of aurora an effective energy deposition process which is easy to identify from the ground-based image data.

Text Partamies_et_al-2017-Journal_of_Geophysical_Research__Space_Physics - Version of Record
Download (3MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 May 2017
Organisations: Physics & Astronomy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 409595
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/409595
ISSN: 0148-0227
PURE UUID: d19c8ef1-e3fd-440d-aa96-e77fd16556b3
ORCID for D. Whiter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7130-232X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 May 2017 04:02
Last modified: 11 Nov 2017 05:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: N. Partamies
Author: D. Whiter ORCID iD
Author: A. Kadokura
Author: K. Kauristie
Author: H. Nesse Tyssøy
Author: S. Massetti
Author: P. Stauning
Author: Tero Raita

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×