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Assessing the usability of gaze-adapted Interface against conventional eye-based input emulation

Assessing the usability of gaze-adapted Interface against conventional eye-based input emulation
Assessing the usability of gaze-adapted Interface against conventional eye-based input emulation
In recent years, eye tracking systems have greatly improved, beginning to play a promising role as an input medium. Eye trackers can be used for application control either by simply emulating the mouse and keyboard devices in the traditional graphical user interface, or by customized interfaces for eye gaze events. In this work, we evaluate these two approaches to assess their impact in usability. We present a gaze-adapted Twitter application interface with direct interaction of eye gaze input, and compare it to Twitter in a conventional browser interface with gaze-based mouse and keyboard emulation. We conducted an experimental study, which indicates a significantly better subjective user experience for the gaze-adapted approach. Based on the results, we argue the need of user interfaces interacting directly to eye gaze input to provide an improved user experience, more specifically in the field of accessibility.
eye tracking, gaze, assistive technology
IEEE
Kumar, Chandan
4b0e33e5-7a97-4c01-88b8-d1c4c588b60a
Menges, Raphael
bc8eb159-2aa4-420d-8644-8f92be265a71
Staab, Steffen
bf48d51b-bd11-4d58-8e1c-4e6e03b30c49
Kumar, Chandan
4b0e33e5-7a97-4c01-88b8-d1c4c588b60a
Menges, Raphael
bc8eb159-2aa4-420d-8644-8f92be265a71
Staab, Steffen
bf48d51b-bd11-4d58-8e1c-4e6e03b30c49

Kumar, Chandan, Menges, Raphael and Staab, Steffen (2017) Assessing the usability of gaze-adapted Interface against conventional eye-based input emulation. In 2017 IEEE International Symposium on Computer-Based Medical Systems. IEEE.. (doi:10.1109/CBMS.2017.155).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In recent years, eye tracking systems have greatly improved, beginning to play a promising role as an input medium. Eye trackers can be used for application control either by simply emulating the mouse and keyboard devices in the traditional graphical user interface, or by customized interfaces for eye gaze events. In this work, we evaluate these two approaches to assess their impact in usability. We present a gaze-adapted Twitter application interface with direct interaction of eye gaze input, and compare it to Twitter in a conventional browser interface with gaze-based mouse and keyboard emulation. We conducted an experimental study, which indicates a significantly better subjective user experience for the gaze-adapted approach. Based on the results, we argue the need of user interfaces interacting directly to eye gaze input to provide an improved user experience, more specifically in the field of accessibility.

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Accepted/In Press date: 11 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 November 2017
Venue - Dates: IEEE International Symposium on Computer-based Medical Systems, Greece, 2017-06-22 - 2017-06-24
Keywords: eye tracking, gaze, assistive technology
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410234
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410234
PURE UUID: 025b28f1-97dc-46aa-a1a4-ef797c58ff13
ORCID for Steffen Staab: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0780-4154

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Date deposited: 06 Jun 2017 04:02
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:07

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Contributors

Author: Chandan Kumar
Author: Raphael Menges
Author: Steffen Staab ORCID iD

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