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Understanding the relationship between engagement in upper limb activity and expectation of motor recovery

Understanding the relationship between engagement in upper limb activity and expectation of motor recovery
Understanding the relationship between engagement in upper limb activity and expectation of motor recovery
Over 75% of people post stroke are left with some degree of upper limb (UL) impairment. Regular UL activity can help to promote neuroplasticity and motor recovery. Clinical guidelines suggest that people with stroke should receive a minimum of 45 minutes of rehabilitation, 5 days a week, although the dose and intensity of activity are person-dependent. However, there is a lack of engagement with UL activity, despite expectation for improved function.

Research objective: To shed light on this disconnect, the current research investigates the relationship between UL activity engagement and expectations for UL motor recovery in stroke.

Data collection: Ten chronic stroke participants and four carers were recruited for a series of individual interviews to explore perceptions of UL stroke rehabilitation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at the University of Southampton by an experienced researcher.

Data analysis: Data were analysed from two sets of interviews using mixed methods. Data from interview 1 showed that people with chronic stroke want to regain more function in their UL, and this motivates them to undertake UL activities. Participants were confident that they could undertake their own UL physical activity plan every day (M= 8.18/10) and persevere to make progress from their stroke (M= 8.45/10). However, despite this, only 2/10 participants engaged in more than 4 hours a week of UL activity. Thus, people with stroke are not engaging in enough UL physical activity. Thematic analysis revealed that reasons cited for not undertaking UL activity were physical (e.g. lack of UL function, spasticity, difficulty fitting external devices); and psychosocial (e.g. mood, motivation, frustration). Interview 2 (underway) will present data exploring their understanding of motor learning and the role of UL activity.
Quality and validity of data and analysis: Themes were generated through discussion by two researchers and reached saturation.

Theoretical and empirical context: The current findings are consistent with previous research into facilitators and barriers of stroke rehabilitation.

Conclusion: This research will provide further understanding into factors affecting engagement in UL activity following stroke, and may provide insight into how engagement in UL activity can be increased.
Meadmore, Katie
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Hughes, Ann-Marie
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Grabham, Neil
00695728-6280-4d06-a943-29142f2547c9
Spraggs, Matthew
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Freeman, Christopher
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Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, John
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Yang, Kai
f1c9b81d-e821-47eb-a69e-b3bc419de9c7
Meadmore, Katie
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Hughes, Ann-Marie
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Grabham, Neil
00695728-6280-4d06-a943-29142f2547c9
Spraggs, Matthew
5683c2e0-0323-44ea-ba21-ba0eaf269e8c
Freeman, Christopher
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Beeby, Stephen
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, John
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Yang, Kai
f1c9b81d-e821-47eb-a69e-b3bc419de9c7

Meadmore, Katie, Hughes, Ann-Marie, Grabham, Neil, Spraggs, Matthew, Freeman, Christopher, Beeby, Stephen, Tudor, John and Yang, Kai (2017) Understanding the relationship between engagement in upper limb activity and expectation of motor recovery. At RehabWeek 2017: Translation and Clinical Delivery: Rehab Week London 2017 (21/07/17) RehabWeek 2017: Translation and Clinical Delivery: Rehab Week London 2017, London, United Kingdom. 17 - 21 Jul 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Over 75% of people post stroke are left with some degree of upper limb (UL) impairment. Regular UL activity can help to promote neuroplasticity and motor recovery. Clinical guidelines suggest that people with stroke should receive a minimum of 45 minutes of rehabilitation, 5 days a week, although the dose and intensity of activity are person-dependent. However, there is a lack of engagement with UL activity, despite expectation for improved function.

Research objective: To shed light on this disconnect, the current research investigates the relationship between UL activity engagement and expectations for UL motor recovery in stroke.

Data collection: Ten chronic stroke participants and four carers were recruited for a series of individual interviews to explore perceptions of UL stroke rehabilitation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted at the University of Southampton by an experienced researcher.

Data analysis: Data were analysed from two sets of interviews using mixed methods. Data from interview 1 showed that people with chronic stroke want to regain more function in their UL, and this motivates them to undertake UL activities. Participants were confident that they could undertake their own UL physical activity plan every day (M= 8.18/10) and persevere to make progress from their stroke (M= 8.45/10). However, despite this, only 2/10 participants engaged in more than 4 hours a week of UL activity. Thus, people with stroke are not engaging in enough UL physical activity. Thematic analysis revealed that reasons cited for not undertaking UL activity were physical (e.g. lack of UL function, spasticity, difficulty fitting external devices); and psychosocial (e.g. mood, motivation, frustration). Interview 2 (underway) will present data exploring their understanding of motor learning and the role of UL activity.
Quality and validity of data and analysis: Themes were generated through discussion by two researchers and reached saturation.

Theoretical and empirical context: The current findings are consistent with previous research into facilitators and barriers of stroke rehabilitation.

Conclusion: This research will provide further understanding into factors affecting engagement in UL activity following stroke, and may provide insight into how engagement in UL activity can be increased.

Text Understanding the Relationship between Engagement in Upper Limb Activity and Expectation of Motor Recovery - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 April 2017
Published date: 17 July 2017
Venue - Dates: RehabWeek 2017: Translation and Clinical Delivery: Rehab Week London 2017, London, United Kingdom, 2017-07-17 - 2017-07-21
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, Advancing Clinical & Expert Practice, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410272
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410272
PURE UUID: 6504629f-7815-45ea-b472-7607b1ee1f42
ORCID for Katie Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370
ORCID for Ann-Marie Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for Neil Grabham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6385-0331
ORCID for Stephen Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Jun 2017 04:03
Last modified: 06 Oct 2018 00:39

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Contributors

Author: Katie Meadmore ORCID iD
Author: Neil Grabham ORCID iD
Author: Matthew Spraggs
Author: Stephen Beeby ORCID iD
Author: John Tudor
Author: Kai Yang

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