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Secondary bacterial infections associated with influenza pandemics

Secondary bacterial infections associated with influenza pandemics
Secondary bacterial infections associated with influenza pandemics
Lower and upper respiratory infections are the fourth highest cause of global mortality (Lozano et al., 2012). Epidemic and pandemic outbreaks of respiratory infection are a major medical concern, often causing considerable disease and a high death toll, typically over a relatively short period of time. Influenza is a major cause of epidemic and pandemic infection. Bacterial co/secondary infection further increases morbidity and mortality of influenza infection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus reported as the most common causes. With increased antibiotic resistance and vaccine evasion it is important to monitor the epidemiology of pathogens in circulation to inform clinical treatment and development, particularly in the setting of an influenza epidemic/pandemic.
Influenza, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, pandemic
1664-302X
1-17
Morris, Denise
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Cleary, David
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Clarke, Stuart
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Morris, Denise
5de4af5f-4112-4bf5-a8b5-6636661244e9
Cleary, David
f4079c6d-d54b-4108-b346-b0069035bec0
Clarke, Stuart
f7d7f7a2-4b1f-4b36-883a-0f967e73fb17

Morris, Denise, Cleary, David and Clarke, Stuart (2017) Secondary bacterial infections associated with influenza pandemics. Frontiers in Microbiology, 8 (1041), 1-17. (doi:10.3389/fmicb.2017.01041).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Lower and upper respiratory infections are the fourth highest cause of global mortality (Lozano et al., 2012). Epidemic and pandemic outbreaks of respiratory infection are a major medical concern, often causing considerable disease and a high death toll, typically over a relatively short period of time. Influenza is a major cause of epidemic and pandemic infection. Bacterial co/secondary infection further increases morbidity and mortality of influenza infection, with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus reported as the most common causes. With increased antibiotic resistance and vaccine evasion it is important to monitor the epidemiology of pathogens in circulation to inform clinical treatment and development, particularly in the setting of an influenza epidemic/pandemic.

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Influenza Pandemics and their Association with Secondary Bacterial infection final v3 20 05 2017 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 May 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 June 2017
Keywords: Influenza, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, pandemic
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences, Tissue Infection & Repair

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410424
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410424
ISSN: 1664-302X
PURE UUID: 030b49d0-f702-4a04-933b-754bb509e038
ORCID for David Cleary: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4533-0700
ORCID for Stuart Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7009-1548

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:46

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