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Implementing complex innovations in fluid multi-stakeholder environments: Experiences of 'telecare'

Implementing complex innovations in fluid multi-stakeholder environments: Experiences of 'telecare'
Implementing complex innovations in fluid multi-stakeholder environments: Experiences of 'telecare'
'Telecare' is the use of information and communication technology to facilitate health and social care delivery to individuals in their own homes. Governments around the world are seeking to introduce telecare partly to help address the challenges posed by an ageing society. Telecare is inherently complex to implement and operate because it involves combination of technological and organisational innovation in an environment of diverse stakeholders. Using research on two telecare schemes in the UK, the paper explores the way project complexity, organisational context and project management approach interacted during the planning and implementation phases. The paper discusses how insights from research in related areas, including medical technology and service sector innovation in general, could help to explain why mainstream telecare delivery has been difficult and draws conclusions on the role of project management in the implementation of innovation. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Healthcare Implementation Service innovation Telecare Telemedicine Computational complexity Health care Information technology Project management Industrial management
0166-4972
396-406
Barlow, J.
ad09305e-0f92-49e5-8f47-83e7a208b0e9
Bayer, S.
28979328-d6fa-4eb7-b6de-9ef97f8e8e97
Curry, R.
a426dc90-9f99-47ef-93a5-21787c20e0a0
Barlow, J.
ad09305e-0f92-49e5-8f47-83e7a208b0e9
Bayer, S.
28979328-d6fa-4eb7-b6de-9ef97f8e8e97
Curry, R.
a426dc90-9f99-47ef-93a5-21787c20e0a0

Barlow, J., Bayer, S. and Curry, R. (2006) Implementing complex innovations in fluid multi-stakeholder environments: Experiences of 'telecare'. Technovation, 26 (3), 396-406. (doi:10.1016/j.technovation.2005.06.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

'Telecare' is the use of information and communication technology to facilitate health and social care delivery to individuals in their own homes. Governments around the world are seeking to introduce telecare partly to help address the challenges posed by an ageing society. Telecare is inherently complex to implement and operate because it involves combination of technological and organisational innovation in an environment of diverse stakeholders. Using research on two telecare schemes in the UK, the paper explores the way project complexity, organisational context and project management approach interacted during the planning and implementation phases. The paper discusses how insights from research in related areas, including medical technology and service sector innovation in general, could help to explain why mainstream telecare delivery has been difficult and draws conclusions on the role of project management in the implementation of innovation. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: Healthcare Implementation Service innovation Telecare Telemedicine Computational complexity Health care Information technology Project management Industrial management
Organisations: Decision Analytics & Risk, NETSCC

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410492
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410492
ISSN: 0166-4972
PURE UUID: 89b969bc-c7b4-42d1-a912-c979f8f8b2f6
ORCID for S. Bayer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7872-467X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:00
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 02:08

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