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Popular European cinema in the 2000s: cinephilia, genre and heritage

Popular European cinema in the 2000s: cinephilia, genre and heritage
Popular European cinema in the 2000s: cinephilia, genre and heritage
The twenty-first century has witnessed a reinvigorated championing of auteurism in European cinema, centred on directors – many of them established veterans from previous decades – such as Pedro Costa, the Dardenne brothers, Michael Haneke, Cristian Mungiu, Christian Petzold, Alexander Sokurov, Béla Tarr and Lars von Trier. This renewed orientation towards art cinema practices (e.g. ‘slow’ cinema, new forms of cinematic realism) and particular channels of circulation (especially the festival circuit) is nowadays articulated within a globally expanded framework (see Galt & Schoonover 2010) that circumvents the Eurocentrism of previous understandings of art cinema. As early as 2005, Thomas Elsaesser noted that European art cinema had irrevocably lost its special status as an aesthetic blueprint and point of reference, becoming one facet within a decentred, post-national and polylocal, new global network of world cinemas (2005: 485–513). At a more fundamental level, European cinema and cinema as a medium itself have undergone radical transformations as a result of a proliferation of media platforms, the technological shift from analogue to digital and new modes of circulation and consumption (cf. Bordwell 2012). Set against these broader contexts and influences, I want to explore in this chapter what, if anything, the concept of ‘popular’ European cinema still signifies today, in terms of this being a productive category for academic enquiry, as a viable form of cinema and as an object of cinephilic attention.
33-58
I.B. Tauris
Bergfelder, Tim
fb4e3b67-06fd-4b9f-9a94-bc73a1c7c16d
Harrod, Mary
Liz, Mariana
Timoshkina, Alissa
Bergfelder, Tim
fb4e3b67-06fd-4b9f-9a94-bc73a1c7c16d
Harrod, Mary
Liz, Mariana
Timoshkina, Alissa

Bergfelder, Tim (2015) Popular European cinema in the 2000s: cinephilia, genre and heritage. In, Harrod, Mary, Liz, Mariana and Timoshkina, Alissa (eds.) The Europeanness of European Cinema: Identity, Meaning, Globalization. London and New York. I.B. Tauris, pp. 33-58. (doi:10.5040/9780755694822.ch-002).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The twenty-first century has witnessed a reinvigorated championing of auteurism in European cinema, centred on directors – many of them established veterans from previous decades – such as Pedro Costa, the Dardenne brothers, Michael Haneke, Cristian Mungiu, Christian Petzold, Alexander Sokurov, Béla Tarr and Lars von Trier. This renewed orientation towards art cinema practices (e.g. ‘slow’ cinema, new forms of cinematic realism) and particular channels of circulation (especially the festival circuit) is nowadays articulated within a globally expanded framework (see Galt & Schoonover 2010) that circumvents the Eurocentrism of previous understandings of art cinema. As early as 2005, Thomas Elsaesser noted that European art cinema had irrevocably lost its special status as an aesthetic blueprint and point of reference, becoming one facet within a decentred, post-national and polylocal, new global network of world cinemas (2005: 485–513). At a more fundamental level, European cinema and cinema as a medium itself have undergone radical transformations as a result of a proliferation of media platforms, the technological shift from analogue to digital and new modes of circulation and consumption (cf. Bordwell 2012). Set against these broader contexts and influences, I want to explore in this chapter what, if anything, the concept of ‘popular’ European cinema still signifies today, in terms of this being a productive category for academic enquiry, as a viable form of cinema and as an object of cinephilic attention.

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Published date: 2015
Organisations: Film

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Local EPrints ID: 410611
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410611
PURE UUID: 28ed9e38-8ac7-4c52-8063-0704142bd37d
ORCID for Tim Bergfelder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6585-6123

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Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:13
Last modified: 09 Mar 2021 02:34

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Author: Tim Bergfelder ORCID iD
Editor: Mary Harrod
Editor: Mariana Liz
Editor: Alissa Timoshkina

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