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The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom

The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom
The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom

The remit of the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (PHR) Programme is to evaluate public health interventions, providing new knowledge on the benefits, costs, acceptability and wider impacts of interventions, set outside of the National Health Service, intended to improve the health of the public and reduce inequalities. This paper illustrates how the PHR Programme is providing new knowledge for public health decision makers, based on the nine key areas for local authority public health action, described by the King's Fund. Many funded PHR projects are evaluating interventions, applied in a range of settings, across the identified key areas for local authority influence. For example, research has been funded on children and young people, and for some of the wider determinants of health, such as housing and travel. Other factors, such as spatial planning, or open and green spaces and leisure, are less represented in the PHR Programme. Further opportunities in research include interventions to improve the health of adolescents, adults in workplaces, and communities. Building evidence for public health interventions at local authority level is important to prioritise and implement effective changes to improve population health.

Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Decision Making, Environment Design, Evidence-Based Medicine, Financing, Government, Health Services Research, Housing, Humans, Local Government, Occupational Health, Public Health, School Health Services, State Medicine, Students, Transportation, United Kingdom, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review
1478-4505
Dorling, Hannah
b96cc46a-7bad-40a9-97fa-cce8c4c965ff
Cook, Andrew
ab9c7bb3-974a-4db9-b3c2-9942988005d5
Ollerhead, Liz
a7607a91-00d3-4f18-9595-7f394b2ea3bc
Westmore, Matthew
e31f9482-d7b0-47ae-bc7c-b47050282916
Dorling, Hannah
b96cc46a-7bad-40a9-97fa-cce8c4c965ff
Cook, Andrew
ab9c7bb3-974a-4db9-b3c2-9942988005d5
Ollerhead, Liz
a7607a91-00d3-4f18-9595-7f394b2ea3bc
Westmore, Matthew
e31f9482-d7b0-47ae-bc7c-b47050282916

Dorling, Hannah, Cook, Andrew, Ollerhead, Liz and Westmore, Matthew (2015) The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom. Health Research Policy and Systems, 13, [77]. (doi:10.1186/s12961-015-0068-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The remit of the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (PHR) Programme is to evaluate public health interventions, providing new knowledge on the benefits, costs, acceptability and wider impacts of interventions, set outside of the National Health Service, intended to improve the health of the public and reduce inequalities. This paper illustrates how the PHR Programme is providing new knowledge for public health decision makers, based on the nine key areas for local authority public health action, described by the King's Fund. Many funded PHR projects are evaluating interventions, applied in a range of settings, across the identified key areas for local authority influence. For example, research has been funded on children and young people, and for some of the wider determinants of health, such as housing and travel. Other factors, such as spatial planning, or open and green spaces and leisure, are less represented in the PHR Programme. Further opportunities in research include interventions to improve the health of adolescents, adults in workplaces, and communities. Building evidence for public health interventions at local authority level is important to prioritise and implement effective changes to improve population health.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 November 2015
Published date: 11 December 2015
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Decision Making, Environment Design, Evidence-Based Medicine, Financing, Government, Health Services Research, Housing, Humans, Local Government, Occupational Health, Public Health, School Health Services, State Medicine, Students, Transportation, United Kingdom, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Review
Organisations: NETSCC

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410804
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410804
ISSN: 1478-4505
PURE UUID: 12b5e0c3-572e-4f01-be03-10fa509d30f6
ORCID for Hannah Dorling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1541-5693
ORCID for Andrew Cook: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6680-439X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:40
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:16

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Contributors

Author: Hannah Dorling ORCID iD
Author: Andrew Cook ORCID iD
Author: Liz Ollerhead

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