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Does quality of life improve in octogenarians following cardiac surgery?: A systematic review

Does quality of life improve in octogenarians following cardiac surgery?: A systematic review
Does quality of life improve in octogenarians following cardiac surgery?: A systematic review

OBJECTIVES: Current outcome measures in cardiac surgery are largely described in terms of mortality. Given the changing demographic profiles and increasingly aged populations referred for cardiac surgery this may not be the most appropriate measure. Postoperative quality of life is an outcome of importance to all ages, but perhaps particularly so for those whose absolute life expectancy is limited by virtue of age. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to clarify and summarise the existing evidence regarding postoperative quality of life of older people following cardiac surgery. For the purpose of this review we defined our population as people aged 80 years of age or over.

METHODS: A systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, trial registers and conference abstracts was undertaken to identify studies addressing quality of life following cardiac surgery in patients 80 or over.

RESULTS: Forty-four studies were identified that addressed this topic, of these nine were prospective therefore overall conclusions are drawn from largely retrospective observational studies. No randomised controlled data were identified.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall there appears to be an improvement in quality of life in the majority of elderly patients following cardiac surgery, however there was a minority in whom quality of life declined (8-19%). There is an urgent need to validate these data and if correct to develop a robust prediction tool to identify these patients before surgery. Such a tool could guide informed consent, policy development and resource allocation.

Activities of Daily Living, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Female, Heart Diseases, Humans, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Quality of Life, Journal Article, Review
e006904
Abah, Udo
f533ab64-fa2a-491b-aa83-0736508fd6fe
Dunne, Mike
29b4692e-9556-4fb8-9d59-6a7432e5828a
Cook, Andrew
ab9c7bb3-974a-4db9-b3c2-9942988005d5
Hoole, Stephen
0801c149-9fb7-4b98-b4bf-1780ee4f1b83
Brayne, Carol
978cfad1-c7f6-4f79-aa1c-4f189eaaf035
Vale, Luke
d0be6b50-51db-4d59-9094-17dcb5582bd8
Large, Stephen
e7eaa664-df70-4123-88b3-3e3eeae58e99
Abah, Udo
f533ab64-fa2a-491b-aa83-0736508fd6fe
Dunne, Mike
29b4692e-9556-4fb8-9d59-6a7432e5828a
Cook, Andrew
ab9c7bb3-974a-4db9-b3c2-9942988005d5
Hoole, Stephen
0801c149-9fb7-4b98-b4bf-1780ee4f1b83
Brayne, Carol
978cfad1-c7f6-4f79-aa1c-4f189eaaf035
Vale, Luke
d0be6b50-51db-4d59-9094-17dcb5582bd8
Large, Stephen
e7eaa664-df70-4123-88b3-3e3eeae58e99

Abah, Udo, Dunne, Mike, Cook, Andrew, Hoole, Stephen, Brayne, Carol, Vale, Luke and Large, Stephen (2015) Does quality of life improve in octogenarians following cardiac surgery?: A systematic review. BMJ Open, 5 (4), e006904. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006904).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Current outcome measures in cardiac surgery are largely described in terms of mortality. Given the changing demographic profiles and increasingly aged populations referred for cardiac surgery this may not be the most appropriate measure. Postoperative quality of life is an outcome of importance to all ages, but perhaps particularly so for those whose absolute life expectancy is limited by virtue of age. We undertook a systematic review of the literature to clarify and summarise the existing evidence regarding postoperative quality of life of older people following cardiac surgery. For the purpose of this review we defined our population as people aged 80 years of age or over.

METHODS: A systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, trial registers and conference abstracts was undertaken to identify studies addressing quality of life following cardiac surgery in patients 80 or over.

RESULTS: Forty-four studies were identified that addressed this topic, of these nine were prospective therefore overall conclusions are drawn from largely retrospective observational studies. No randomised controlled data were identified.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall there appears to be an improvement in quality of life in the majority of elderly patients following cardiac surgery, however there was a minority in whom quality of life declined (8-19%). There is an urgent need to validate these data and if correct to develop a robust prediction tool to identify these patients before surgery. Such a tool could guide informed consent, policy development and resource allocation.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 February 2015
Published date: 28 April 2015
Keywords: Activities of Daily Living, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Female, Heart Diseases, Humans, Male, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Quality of Life, Journal Article, Review
Organisations: NETSCC

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410805
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410805
PURE UUID: 664f1d3d-33c1-4417-81e4-25f17ae7b83d
ORCID for Andrew Cook: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6680-439X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:40
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:41

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Contributors

Author: Udo Abah
Author: Mike Dunne
Author: Andrew Cook ORCID iD
Author: Stephen Hoole
Author: Carol Brayne
Author: Luke Vale
Author: Stephen Large

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