The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Mechanisms of the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on continuous manual control performance

Mechanisms of the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on continuous manual control performance
Mechanisms of the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on continuous manual control performance

This paper describes three experiments, performed to determine the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on a zero order, pursuit tracking task, and to discover the mechanisms responsible for these effects. The first experiment investigated the effect on tracking performance of vertical, sinusoidal vibration of the control stick in the frequency range 4 to 64 Hz. Control dynamics were either isotonic (displacement), isometric (force) or spring-centred. The second experiment investigated the effect of level of vertical, 4 Hz and 16 Hz whole-body and control vibration on performance with the isotonic and isometric controls. Experiment 3 investigated the effects of duration of continuous, vertical, whole-body vibration at 4 Hz, for durations up to 1 h, on performance with the isotonic and isometric controls. Performance measures included closed-loop transfer functions of the human operator and components of mean-square tracking error correlated with the forcing functions and vibration, and those due to operator-generated noise or remnant. The results indicated that the primary effects of vibration on the tracking task were increases in remnant and vibration-correlated error. Perceptual and motor sources are suggested for the increased remnant. The effects were largest with 4 Hz vibration and were found to be effectively constant throughout 1 h exposures to continuous 4 Hz whole-body vibration, but after relatively short periods the effect on overall tracking performance was effectively masked by large increases in response lags and suppression of coherent responses, which occurred in both static and vibration conditions as a consequence of diminished levels of arousal.

0014-0139
855-889
Lewis, Christopher H.
6a953646-70d2-4785-9f6d-ee6f90b16cd5
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Lewis, Christopher H.
6a953646-70d2-4785-9f6d-ee6f90b16cd5
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Lewis, Christopher H. and Griffin, Michael J. (1979) Mechanisms of the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on continuous manual control performance. Ergonomics, 22 (7), 855-889. (doi:10.1080/00140137908924662).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper describes three experiments, performed to determine the effects of vibration frequency, level and duration on a zero order, pursuit tracking task, and to discover the mechanisms responsible for these effects. The first experiment investigated the effect on tracking performance of vertical, sinusoidal vibration of the control stick in the frequency range 4 to 64 Hz. Control dynamics were either isotonic (displacement), isometric (force) or spring-centred. The second experiment investigated the effect of level of vertical, 4 Hz and 16 Hz whole-body and control vibration on performance with the isotonic and isometric controls. Experiment 3 investigated the effects of duration of continuous, vertical, whole-body vibration at 4 Hz, for durations up to 1 h, on performance with the isotonic and isometric controls. Performance measures included closed-loop transfer functions of the human operator and components of mean-square tracking error correlated with the forcing functions and vibration, and those due to operator-generated noise or remnant. The results indicated that the primary effects of vibration on the tracking task were increases in remnant and vibration-correlated error. Perceptual and motor sources are suggested for the increased remnant. The effects were largest with 4 Hz vibration and were found to be effectively constant throughout 1 h exposures to continuous 4 Hz whole-body vibration, but after relatively short periods the effect on overall tracking performance was effectively masked by large increases in response lags and suppression of coherent responses, which occurred in both static and vibration conditions as a consequence of diminished levels of arousal.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1979
Organisations: University of Southampton, Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410862
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410862
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: 91ce2faa-dddc-412a-813a-acf2dd594997
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:47
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×