The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Evaluation of vibration with respect to human response

Evaluation of vibration with respect to human response
Evaluation of vibration with respect to human response

Methods of quantifying vibration with respect to human response are fully defined. The procedures may be applied to all types of vibration: multiple-axis and multiple-input motions which are steady-state, random or transient. The procedures are based on experimental research and have been applied to predict the discomfort, annoyance, health risks, interference with activities and motion sickness associated with vibration measured in a wide range of environments. The general method involves the assessment of 12 axes of vibration (the 3 translational and 3 rotational axes on a seat surface, the 3 translational axes at the seat back and the 3 translational axes at the feet). The method may be simplified so as to include only those axes of interest in specific environments. A scale of approximate discomfort, an 'action level' guide to the prevention of health effects, magnitudes of vibration which may interfere with activities, and a means of predicting the probability of motion sickness are provided. In all cases the frequencies, axes, locations and durations of the motions responsible for adverse effects can be identified. The application of the procedures to evaluate measurements in vehicles, assess computer predictions of vehicle vibration and optimise seat dynamics is described.

11-34
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Griffin, Michael J. (1986) Evaluation of vibration with respect to human response. In SAE Technical Papers. pp. 11-34 . (doi:10.4271/860047).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Methods of quantifying vibration with respect to human response are fully defined. The procedures may be applied to all types of vibration: multiple-axis and multiple-input motions which are steady-state, random or transient. The procedures are based on experimental research and have been applied to predict the discomfort, annoyance, health risks, interference with activities and motion sickness associated with vibration measured in a wide range of environments. The general method involves the assessment of 12 axes of vibration (the 3 translational and 3 rotational axes on a seat surface, the 3 translational axes at the seat back and the 3 translational axes at the feet). The method may be simplified so as to include only those axes of interest in specific environments. A scale of approximate discomfort, an 'action level' guide to the prevention of health effects, magnitudes of vibration which may interfere with activities, and a means of predicting the probability of motion sickness are provided. In all cases the frequencies, axes, locations and durations of the motions responsible for adverse effects can be identified. The application of the procedures to evaluate measurements in vehicles, assess computer predictions of vehicle vibration and optimise seat dynamics is described.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 24 February 1986
Organisations: University of Southampton, Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410876
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410876
PURE UUID: 68380e41-8ec4-4171-b308-8bf920169ef3
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:47
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×