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Prediction of the incidence of motion sickness from the magnitude, frequency, and duration of vertical oscillation

Prediction of the incidence of motion sickness from the magnitude, frequency, and duration of vertical oscillation
Prediction of the incidence of motion sickness from the magnitude, frequency, and duration of vertical oscillation

A method is proposed by which the incidence of motion sickness may be predicted from measurement of the motion exposure. The method is based on data from both field and laboratory studies involving large numbers of people and is applicable to marine and other environments where vertical oscillation occurs at frequencies below 0.5 Hz. The dependence of motion sickness on the frequency of oscillation requires the use of a weighting function between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz. The dependence of sickness on the duration of exposure is incorporated by the use of a cumulative measure of motion dose based on the product of root-mean-square (rms) acceleration magnitude and the square root of stimulus duration. The influence of population variables such as sex, age, and motion experience is discussed. The method enables separate predictions to be made of vomiting incidence and of feelings of illness. The prediction procedure, while not seeking to explain the underlying mechanisms of motion sickness occurrence, provides a generally applicable method which is simple to use and has an accuracy consistent with the experimental data on which it is based.

0001-4966
957-966
Lawther, Anthony
569f88e6-b02b-4049-b9a0-ed1d56a53d10
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Lawther, Anthony
569f88e6-b02b-4049-b9a0-ed1d56a53d10
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Lawther, Anthony and Griffin, Michael J. (1987) Prediction of the incidence of motion sickness from the magnitude, frequency, and duration of vertical oscillation. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 82 (3), 957-966. (doi:10.1121/1.395295).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A method is proposed by which the incidence of motion sickness may be predicted from measurement of the motion exposure. The method is based on data from both field and laboratory studies involving large numbers of people and is applicable to marine and other environments where vertical oscillation occurs at frequencies below 0.5 Hz. The dependence of motion sickness on the frequency of oscillation requires the use of a weighting function between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz. The dependence of sickness on the duration of exposure is incorporated by the use of a cumulative measure of motion dose based on the product of root-mean-square (rms) acceleration magnitude and the square root of stimulus duration. The influence of population variables such as sex, age, and motion experience is discussed. The method enables separate predictions to be made of vomiting incidence and of feelings of illness. The prediction procedure, while not seeking to explain the underlying mechanisms of motion sickness occurrence, provides a generally applicable method which is simple to use and has an accuracy consistent with the experimental data on which it is based.

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More information

Published date: 1987
Organisations: Human Factors Research Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410880
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410880
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 982bd9d5-f8d9-4522-b6bb-27fc200b6722
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:47
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:56

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