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Neutron stars in the laboratory

Neutron stars in the laboratory
Neutron stars in the laboratory
Neutron stars are astrophysical laboratories of many extremes of physics. Their rich phenomenology provides insights into the state and composition of matter at densities which cannot be reached in terrestrial experiments. Since the core of a mature neutron star is expected to be dominated by superfluid and superconducting components, observations also probe the dynamics of large-scale quantum condensates. The testing and understanding of the relevant theory tends to focus on the interface between the astrophysics phenomenology and nuclear physics. The connections with low-temperature experiments tend to be ignored. However, there has been dramatic progress in understanding laboratory condensates (from the different phases of superfluid helium to the entire range of superconductors and cold atom condensates). In this review, we provide an overview of these developments, compare and contrast the mathematical descriptions of laboratory condensates and neutron stars and summarise the current experimental state-of-the-art. This discussion suggests novel ways that we may make progress in understanding neutron star physics using low-temperature laboratory experiments.
0218-2718
Andersson, Nils
2dd6d1ee-cefd-478a-b1ac-e6feedafe304
Graber, Vanessa
e32f2d3a-024a-4d5c-8272-2c0833073a15
Hogg, Michael
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Andersson, Nils, Graber, Vanessa and Hogg, Michael (2017) Neutron stars in the laboratory International Journal of Modern Physics D (doi:10.1142/S0218271817300154).

Andersson, Nils, Graber, Vanessa and Hogg, Michael (2017) Neutron stars in the laboratory International Journal of Modern Physics D (doi:10.1142/S0218271817300154).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Neutron stars are astrophysical laboratories of many extremes of physics. Their rich phenomenology provides insights into the state and composition of matter at densities which cannot be reached in terrestrial experiments. Since the core of a mature neutron star is expected to be dominated by superfluid and superconducting components, observations also probe the dynamics of large-scale quantum condensates. The testing and understanding of the relevant theory tends to focus on the interface between the astrophysics phenomenology and nuclear physics. The connections with low-temperature experiments tend to be ignored. However, there has been dramatic progress in understanding laboratory condensates (from the different phases of superfluid helium to the entire range of superconductors and cold atom condensates). In this review, we provide an overview of these developments, compare and contrast the mathematical descriptions of laboratory condensates and neutron stars and summarise the current experimental state-of-the-art. This discussion suggests novel ways that we may make progress in understanding neutron star physics using low-temperature laboratory experiments.

PDF 1610.06882 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 March 2017
Organisations: Foundation Year, Applied Mathematics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410922
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410922
ISSN: 0218-2718
PURE UUID: 99ca980c-b1c5-4091-b81b-5470f97d67b1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 16:32
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 13:51

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