The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Evaluating the feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme for naval service personnel with excess body weight

Evaluating the feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme for naval service personnel with excess body weight
Evaluating the feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme for naval service personnel with excess body weight
Background:

Overweight and obesity are a major concern that may influence the operational capacity of the UK Naval Service (NS). This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of trialling and implementing a modified web-based weight loss programme for overweight and obese NS personnel.

Methods:

The feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme with minimal face to face support was evaluated using a non-randomised design, based on the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, and Implementation (RE-AIM) dimensions of a framework designed for analysing implementation of interventions in practice.

Results:

It was estimated that 6% (n = 58) of eligible NS personnel at recruitment sites were reached, based on personnel’s expressions of interest to take part in the study. The potential efficacy of the intervention was evaluated by analysing participants’ change in weight (kg) in the two groups. Forty-three participants were allocated to the intervention (n = 21) or control group (n = 22). Website usage was low, with 1.5 sessions accessed on average, over a 12-week follow-up. Changes in body weight over 12 weeks appeared to be observed for participants in the intervention group but not in the control group. The average weight loss observed in the intervention group (mean = −1.9 kg, SD = 2.1) appeared to reach significance, 95% CI [−2.8, −1.0], whereas no significant weight loss was apparent among control group participants (mean = −0.8 kg, SD = 3.8), 95% CI [−2.4, 0.8]. However, this feasibility study was not powered to test for within or group differences. Recruitment rates varied across five NS establishments invited to take part in the study, suggesting that the web-based weight loss programme was not adopted to the same extent across all bases. The online programme was not implemented as intended in terms of regular usage by participants and support provision by physical training instructors.

Conclusion:

The results suggest that the intervention may warrant further investigation provided that engagement with the intervention by both staff and participants can be improved.
1-10
Garip, Gülcan
37277721-8c25-47c6-8988-274774e89d6a
Morton, Kate
6fa41cd3-ba4d-476c-9020-b8ef93c7ade7
Bridger, Robert
3d25823c-0a9c-4fd0-b035-7a226541e71b
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Garip, Gülcan
37277721-8c25-47c6-8988-274774e89d6a
Morton, Kate
6fa41cd3-ba4d-476c-9020-b8ef93c7ade7
Bridger, Robert
3d25823c-0a9c-4fd0-b035-7a226541e71b
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Garip, Gülcan, Morton, Kate, Bridger, Robert and Yardley, Lucy (2017) Evaluating the feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme for naval service personnel with excess body weight. Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 3 (6), 1-10. (doi:10.1186/s40814-017-0122-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:

Overweight and obesity are a major concern that may influence the operational capacity of the UK Naval Service (NS). This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of trialling and implementing a modified web-based weight loss programme for overweight and obese NS personnel.

Methods:

The feasibility of a web-based weight loss programme with minimal face to face support was evaluated using a non-randomised design, based on the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, and Implementation (RE-AIM) dimensions of a framework designed for analysing implementation of interventions in practice.

Results:

It was estimated that 6% (n = 58) of eligible NS personnel at recruitment sites were reached, based on personnel’s expressions of interest to take part in the study. The potential efficacy of the intervention was evaluated by analysing participants’ change in weight (kg) in the two groups. Forty-three participants were allocated to the intervention (n = 21) or control group (n = 22). Website usage was low, with 1.5 sessions accessed on average, over a 12-week follow-up. Changes in body weight over 12 weeks appeared to be observed for participants in the intervention group but not in the control group. The average weight loss observed in the intervention group (mean = −1.9 kg, SD = 2.1) appeared to reach significance, 95% CI [−2.8, −1.0], whereas no significant weight loss was apparent among control group participants (mean = −0.8 kg, SD = 3.8), 95% CI [−2.4, 0.8]. However, this feasibility study was not powered to test for within or group differences. Recruitment rates varied across five NS establishments invited to take part in the study, suggesting that the web-based weight loss programme was not adopted to the same extent across all bases. The online programme was not implemented as intended in terms of regular usage by participants and support provision by physical training instructors.

Conclusion:

The results suggest that the intervention may warrant further investigation provided that engagement with the intervention by both staff and participants can be improved.

Text
art_10.1186_s40814-017-0122-2 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (721kB)
Text
Manuscript final accepted version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (250kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 February 2017
Organisations: Human Wellbeing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411110
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411110
PURE UUID: 04e59e85-e0a4-4f42-8248-617d057d9b46
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:11

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×