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Measuring active and healthy ageing in Europe

Measuring active and healthy ageing in Europe
Measuring active and healthy ageing in Europe
The active and healthy ageing measure reported here is calculated for the 28 European Union countries, with a specific focus on the current generation of older people and by using the latest data from multiple surveys.
It covers diverse aspects of active and healthy ageing, by measuring older people’s contribution with respect to not just employment but also their unpaid familial, social and cultural contributions and their independent,
healthy and secure living. The article presents the first-of-its-kind quantitative measure of active and healthy ageing in the literature on active and healthy ageing which hitherto has focused largely on concepts, definitions
and public policy strategies. In this pursuit, an important contribution of this measure, referred to as the Active Ageing Index (‘AAI’), is that it also captures how countries differ with respect to capacity and enabling environments for active and healthy ageing. The AAI offers a breakdown not just by four domains of active and healthy ageing but also by gender. Key findings are that Sweden comes at the top of the country ranking, followed closely by Denmark, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Netherlands and Ireland. The four southern
European countries (Italy, Portugal, Spain and Malta) are middle-ranked countries. Greece and many of the Central European countries are at the bottom, highlighting much greater untapped potentials of active and healthy ageing among older people in these countries and a need for greater policy efforts. Women fare worse than men in most countries, identifying a need for an emphasis on reducing gender disparity in experiences of active and healthy ageing. The AAI tool developed has the potential to identify the social policy mechanisms behind the differential achievements of active and healthy ageing, for example, what active and healthy ageing strategies have driven top performers, and in what respect the bottom-ranked countries have lagged behind.
Active ageing, demographic ageing, social policy, older people, healthy ageing, European Union
0958-9287
138-157
Zaidi, Asghar
c0e9133f-e3da-47ed-8cd6-2473386bddf4
Gasior, Katrin
3631010a-1a92-47d3-8c19-c220fbe13013
Zolyomi, Eszter
f5ecbf13-0d93-4d19-9f9e-d6cc736201c0
Schmidt, Andrea
19ea00cb-1ac9-4a6a-b243-e9cfe971e17d
Rodrigues, Ricardo
7f541af4-e0b7-4b84-9888-67140a9d8c42
Marin, Bernd
1c275c32-d991-4ef4-85f2-abd8e3dc0998
Zaidi, Asghar
c0e9133f-e3da-47ed-8cd6-2473386bddf4
Gasior, Katrin
3631010a-1a92-47d3-8c19-c220fbe13013
Zolyomi, Eszter
f5ecbf13-0d93-4d19-9f9e-d6cc736201c0
Schmidt, Andrea
19ea00cb-1ac9-4a6a-b243-e9cfe971e17d
Rodrigues, Ricardo
7f541af4-e0b7-4b84-9888-67140a9d8c42
Marin, Bernd
1c275c32-d991-4ef4-85f2-abd8e3dc0998

Zaidi, Asghar, Gasior, Katrin, Zolyomi, Eszter, Schmidt, Andrea, Rodrigues, Ricardo and Marin, Bernd (2017) Measuring active and healthy ageing in Europe. Journal of European Social Policy, 27 (2), 138-157. (doi:10.1177/0958928716676550).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The active and healthy ageing measure reported here is calculated for the 28 European Union countries, with a specific focus on the current generation of older people and by using the latest data from multiple surveys.
It covers diverse aspects of active and healthy ageing, by measuring older people’s contribution with respect to not just employment but also their unpaid familial, social and cultural contributions and their independent,
healthy and secure living. The article presents the first-of-its-kind quantitative measure of active and healthy ageing in the literature on active and healthy ageing which hitherto has focused largely on concepts, definitions
and public policy strategies. In this pursuit, an important contribution of this measure, referred to as the Active Ageing Index (‘AAI’), is that it also captures how countries differ with respect to capacity and enabling environments for active and healthy ageing. The AAI offers a breakdown not just by four domains of active and healthy ageing but also by gender. Key findings are that Sweden comes at the top of the country ranking, followed closely by Denmark, the United Kingdom, Finland, the Netherlands and Ireland. The four southern
European countries (Italy, Portugal, Spain and Malta) are middle-ranked countries. Greece and many of the Central European countries are at the bottom, highlighting much greater untapped potentials of active and healthy ageing among older people in these countries and a need for greater policy efforts. Women fare worse than men in most countries, identifying a need for an emphasis on reducing gender disparity in experiences of active and healthy ageing. The AAI tool developed has the potential to identify the social policy mechanisms behind the differential achievements of active and healthy ageing, for example, what active and healthy ageing strategies have driven top performers, and in what respect the bottom-ranked countries have lagged behind.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 November 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 January 2017
Published date: 1 May 2017
Keywords: Active ageing, demographic ageing, social policy, older people, healthy ageing, European Union
Organisations: Gerontology, Centre for Population Change

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411119
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411119
ISSN: 0958-9287
PURE UUID: 83f1955a-c958-4565-b007-33edcda97e8a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:48

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