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Cerebral autoregulation: every normal subject is the average, the rest is noise?

Cerebral autoregulation: every normal subject is the average, the rest is noise?
Cerebral autoregulation: every normal subject is the average, the rest is noise?
Cerebral autoregulation (CA) refers to the ability of the brain to maintain blood flow approximately constant, when blood pressure changes. The assessment of CA presents many challenges and often leads to considerable dispersion among CA measures even within groups of healthy adults. This results in great difficulty in setting a clear border between normal and impaired CA. The current work considers if the diversity of results seen in normal subjects is just "noise", or might provide useful information that could be exploited in developing more robust clinical assessment methods. In this paper we ask how between- and within-subject variability in CA compare, and how this changes between rest and a protocol with augmented variability in blood pressure. The latter was motivated by the previous observation that increased variability (unsurprisingly) leads to more robust estimates of the relationship between blood pressure and flow. In the current work, random inflations of thigh-cuffs (TC) were used to provoke this increased challenge to the CA system.
Simpson, David
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Nikolic, Dragana
772b3eb2-c994-440a-ab86-27e862bd39f7
Katsogridakis, Emmanuel
863d80d0-d656-453d-98fe-70f2c16aaaf9
Panerai, Ronney B.
7acaf714-a17c-4df2-a1f3-b148c1445517
Simpson, David
53674880-f381-4cc9-8505-6a97eeac3c2a
Nikolic, Dragana
772b3eb2-c994-440a-ab86-27e862bd39f7
Katsogridakis, Emmanuel
863d80d0-d656-453d-98fe-70f2c16aaaf9
Panerai, Ronney B.
7acaf714-a17c-4df2-a1f3-b148c1445517

Simpson, David, Nikolic, Dragana, Katsogridakis, Emmanuel and Panerai, Ronney B. (2016) Cerebral autoregulation: every normal subject is the average, the rest is noise? The European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, Lancaster, United Kingdom, United Kingdom. 09 - 13 Apr 2016. 2 pp . (Submitted)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Cerebral autoregulation (CA) refers to the ability of the brain to maintain blood flow approximately constant, when blood pressure changes. The assessment of CA presents many challenges and often leads to considerable dispersion among CA measures even within groups of healthy adults. This results in great difficulty in setting a clear border between normal and impaired CA. The current work considers if the diversity of results seen in normal subjects is just "noise", or might provide useful information that could be exploited in developing more robust clinical assessment methods. In this paper we ask how between- and within-subject variability in CA compare, and how this changes between rest and a protocol with augmented variability in blood pressure. The latter was motivated by the previous observation that increased variability (unsurprisingly) leads to more robust estimates of the relationship between blood pressure and flow. In the current work, random inflations of thigh-cuffs (TC) were used to provoke this increased challenge to the CA system.

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More information

Submitted date: 10 April 2016
Venue - Dates: The European Study Group on Cardiovascular Oscillations, Lancaster, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, 2016-04-09 - 2016-04-13
Organisations: Signal Processing & Control Grp, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411186
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411186
PURE UUID: cb3e9d2a-9122-4298-90bd-421357293054

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Date deposited: 15 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 31 Jul 2020 16:31

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