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Trimming of ring resonators via ion implantation in silicon

Trimming of ring resonators via ion implantation in silicon
Trimming of ring resonators via ion implantation in silicon
Ion implantation into silicon causes radiation damage. If a sufficient dose is implanted, complete amorphisation can result in any implanted part of an optical device. Amorphous silicon has a refractive index that is significantly different higher than that of crystalline silicon (~10-1), and can therefore form the basis of a refractive index change in optical devices. This refractive index change can be partially or completely removed by annealing. In recent years we have presented results on the development of erasable gratings in silicon to facilitate wafer scale testing of silicon photonics circuits. These gratings are formed by amorphising selected areas of silicon by utilising ion implantation of Germanium. However, we have now used similar technology for trimming of integrated photonic components. In this paper we discuss design, modelling and fabrication of ring resonators and their subsequent trimming using ion implantation of Germanium into silicon followed by annealing.
Reed, Graham
ca08dd60-c072-4d7d-b254-75714d570139
Milošević, Milan
b28da945-84a5-4317-8896-6d9ea6a69589
Chen, Xia
64f6ab92-ca11-4489-8c03-52bc986209ae
Thomson, David
17c1626c-2422-42c6-98e0-586ae220bcda
Reed, Graham
ca08dd60-c072-4d7d-b254-75714d570139
Milošević, Milan
b28da945-84a5-4317-8896-6d9ea6a69589
Chen, Xia
64f6ab92-ca11-4489-8c03-52bc986209ae
Thomson, David
17c1626c-2422-42c6-98e0-586ae220bcda

Reed, Graham, Milošević, Milan, Chen, Xia and Thomson, David (2017) Trimming of ring resonators via ion implantation in silicon. Integrated Optics: Physics and Simulations III, Prague, Czech Republic. 24 Apr 2017. (doi:10.1117/12.2271673).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Ion implantation into silicon causes radiation damage. If a sufficient dose is implanted, complete amorphisation can result in any implanted part of an optical device. Amorphous silicon has a refractive index that is significantly different higher than that of crystalline silicon (~10-1), and can therefore form the basis of a refractive index change in optical devices. This refractive index change can be partially or completely removed by annealing. In recent years we have presented results on the development of erasable gratings in silicon to facilitate wafer scale testing of silicon photonics circuits. These gratings are formed by amorphising selected areas of silicon by utilising ion implantation of Germanium. However, we have now used similar technology for trimming of integrated photonic components. In this paper we discuss design, modelling and fabrication of ring resonators and their subsequent trimming using ion implantation of Germanium into silicon followed by annealing.

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More information

Published date: April 2017
Venue - Dates: Integrated Optics: Physics and Simulations III, Prague, Czech Republic, 2017-04-24 - 2017-04-24
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre, Photonic Systems Circuits & Sensors

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411208
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411208
PURE UUID: 2782aebb-a628-4919-b0a7-e79bee45735f
ORCID for Xia Chen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0994-5401

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:37

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