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Understanding trauma-related stress in relation to the self

Understanding trauma-related stress in relation to the self
Understanding trauma-related stress in relation to the self
Trauma and trauma-related stress disorders are extremely prevalent in today’s society with a prevalence rate of 50-75% (Green et al., 2016). In combination with a rising survivor rate from the ongoing war on terror, trauma-related stress disorders are weighing heavily on the NHS and other treatment centres. With this in mind, the research herein evaluated ways in which an individual might be more resistant to traumatic experiences, and whether treatment and recovery rates of trauma suffers could be improved.

The theoretical approach used as the framework for this research was based in a psychological field which has grown out of health and medicine. This framework included the salutogenic approach as outlined by Aaron Antonovsky (1987), and is a view of understanding human health in terms of overall wellbeing and not selective pathology. In addition, the theories from the positive psychology movement, resilience research, and posttraumatic growth were utilized to better understand health, wellbeing, and thriving.

Out of these theories, much discourse has developed on the benefits of a healthy, robust sense of self. The research conducted in this thesis has applied aspects of these theories utilizing the self and its attributes as a crucial protective factor for health and wellbeing. More specifically, the concept of a robust sense of self was constructed as a holistic “defence” against the negative effects of trauma-related stress. This model was tested through two experimental design studies. One to test how different inherent levels of sense of self protect against a trauma analogue, and the other to test how a positive imagery manipulation could act as an additional protective factor when facing traumatic experiences.
University of Southampton
McWilliams-Biles, Krislyn Gayle
7ac25a1a-a768-4b17-b4bd-8cc36cfda839
McWilliams-Biles, Krislyn Gayle
7ac25a1a-a768-4b17-b4bd-8cc36cfda839
Stopa, Lusia
b52f29fc-d1c2-450d-b321-68f95fa22c40

McWilliams-Biles, Krislyn Gayle (2017) Understanding trauma-related stress in relation to the self. University of Southampton, Masters Thesis, 152pp.

Record type: Thesis (Masters)

Abstract

Trauma and trauma-related stress disorders are extremely prevalent in today’s society with a prevalence rate of 50-75% (Green et al., 2016). In combination with a rising survivor rate from the ongoing war on terror, trauma-related stress disorders are weighing heavily on the NHS and other treatment centres. With this in mind, the research herein evaluated ways in which an individual might be more resistant to traumatic experiences, and whether treatment and recovery rates of trauma suffers could be improved.

The theoretical approach used as the framework for this research was based in a psychological field which has grown out of health and medicine. This framework included the salutogenic approach as outlined by Aaron Antonovsky (1987), and is a view of understanding human health in terms of overall wellbeing and not selective pathology. In addition, the theories from the positive psychology movement, resilience research, and posttraumatic growth were utilized to better understand health, wellbeing, and thriving.

Out of these theories, much discourse has developed on the benefits of a healthy, robust sense of self. The research conducted in this thesis has applied aspects of these theories utilizing the self and its attributes as a crucial protective factor for health and wellbeing. More specifically, the concept of a robust sense of self was constructed as a holistic “defence” against the negative effects of trauma-related stress. This model was tested through two experimental design studies. One to test how different inherent levels of sense of self protect against a trauma analogue, and the other to test how a positive imagery manipulation could act as an additional protective factor when facing traumatic experiences.

Text
Krislyn McWilliams-Biles - Version of Record
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Published date: April 2017
Organisations: University of Southampton, Psychology

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Local EPrints ID: 411265
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411265
PURE UUID: 7abb9ea1-159a-41b3-a024-2efb16b9bcaa

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Date deposited: 16 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:53

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