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Nonlinear stress-strain behaviour of corrosion-damaged reinforcing bars including inelastic buckling

Nonlinear stress-strain behaviour of corrosion-damaged reinforcing bars including inelastic buckling
Nonlinear stress-strain behaviour of corrosion-damaged reinforcing bars including inelastic buckling
In the seismic design and assessment of reinforced concrete structures in earthquake zones buckling of longitudinal reinforcement in plastic hinge regions is an important limit state that needs to be considered. If the structure is located in an environmentally aggressive area, it is also subject to material deterioration over its service life. Corrosion of reinforcement is the most common type of deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and bridges. In this paper the nonlinear stress–strain behaviour of corroded reinforcing bars has been investigated by extensive experimental testing. The effect of different corrosion levels on the tension and compression behaviour of bars with different slenderness ratios is presented. The results of this study show that a corrosion level above 15% mass loss significantly affects the ductility and plastic deformation of reinforcement in tension and that corrosion changes the buckling collapse mechanism of the bars in compression. The results of buckling tests show that 10% mass loss produces about a 20% reduction in the buckling capacity of corroded bars. The results also show that the distribution of corrosion pits along the length of corroded bars is the most important parameter affecting the stress–strain response in both tension and compression. Furthermore, a constitutive material model to predict the post-yield buckling behaviour of high-strength steel without a yield plateau is also developed. The proposed analytical model is based on Dhakal–Maekawa buckling model. The analytical model has been validated against experimental tests on uncorroded and corroded bars. The results of this corrosion extended buckling model show a good agreement with the physical testing.
Reinforcing steel, Corrosion, Inelastic buckling, Post-buckling, Stress-strain relationship, Constitutive models, Nonlinear analysis, STEEL BARS, CYCLIC BEHAVIOR, CONCRETE, STABILITY, COLUMNS, MEMBERS, BRIDGE, MODEL
0141-0296
417-429
Kashani, Mohammad M.
d1074b3a-5853-4eb5-a4ef-7d741b1c025d
Crewe, Adam J.
89d119a7-3a3e-489c-8330-cfaf55ac8857
Alexander, Nicholas A.
544fc8c7-40a4-4e81-aaab-89e78f1a6fc9
Kashani, Mohammad M.
d1074b3a-5853-4eb5-a4ef-7d741b1c025d
Crewe, Adam J.
89d119a7-3a3e-489c-8330-cfaf55ac8857
Alexander, Nicholas A.
544fc8c7-40a4-4e81-aaab-89e78f1a6fc9

Kashani, Mohammad M., Crewe, Adam J. and Alexander, Nicholas A. (2013) Nonlinear stress-strain behaviour of corrosion-damaged reinforcing bars including inelastic buckling. Engineering Structures, 48, 417-429. (doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2012.09.034).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the seismic design and assessment of reinforced concrete structures in earthquake zones buckling of longitudinal reinforcement in plastic hinge regions is an important limit state that needs to be considered. If the structure is located in an environmentally aggressive area, it is also subject to material deterioration over its service life. Corrosion of reinforcement is the most common type of deterioration of reinforced concrete (RC) structures and bridges. In this paper the nonlinear stress–strain behaviour of corroded reinforcing bars has been investigated by extensive experimental testing. The effect of different corrosion levels on the tension and compression behaviour of bars with different slenderness ratios is presented. The results of this study show that a corrosion level above 15% mass loss significantly affects the ductility and plastic deformation of reinforcement in tension and that corrosion changes the buckling collapse mechanism of the bars in compression. The results of buckling tests show that 10% mass loss produces about a 20% reduction in the buckling capacity of corroded bars. The results also show that the distribution of corrosion pits along the length of corroded bars is the most important parameter affecting the stress–strain response in both tension and compression. Furthermore, a constitutive material model to predict the post-yield buckling behaviour of high-strength steel without a yield plateau is also developed. The proposed analytical model is based on Dhakal–Maekawa buckling model. The analytical model has been validated against experimental tests on uncorroded and corroded bars. The results of this corrosion extended buckling model show a good agreement with the physical testing.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 September 2012
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2012
Published date: 1 March 2013
Keywords: Reinforcing steel, Corrosion, Inelastic buckling, Post-buckling, Stress-strain relationship, Constitutive models, Nonlinear analysis, STEEL BARS, CYCLIC BEHAVIOR, CONCRETE, STABILITY, COLUMNS, MEMBERS, BRIDGE, MODEL
Organisations: Infrastructure Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411373
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411373
ISSN: 0141-0296
PURE UUID: 17ec3cdd-3070-45ae-ad97-ce38941682f7
ORCID for Mohammad M. Kashani: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0008-0007

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 00:27

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