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Power, identity and miracles on a medieval frontier

Power, identity and miracles on a medieval frontier
Power, identity and miracles on a medieval frontier
A thriving port, a frontier base for the lords of Gower and a multi-cultural urban community, the south Wales town of Swansea was an important centre in the Middle Ages, at a nexus of multiple identities, cultural practices and configurations of power. As the principal town of the Marcher lordship of Gower and seat of the Marcher lord's rule, Swansea was a site of contested authority, colonial control and complex interactions – and collisions – between different cultures, languages and traditions. Swansea also features in the miracle collection prepared for the canonisation of Thomas Cantilupe, Bishop of Hereford (d. 1282), as the setting for the intriguing case of the hanging and strange revival of the Welsh rebel, William Cragh. Taking medieval Swansea and Wales as its starting point, this volume brings into focus questions of place, power, identity and belief, bringing together inter-disciplinary perspectives which span History, Literary Studies and Geography / Archaeology, and engaging with current debates in the fields of medieval frontier studies, urban history, manuscript studies and hagiography.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Medieval History.
Routledge
Clarke, Catherine
9b091d13-bf1c-4f13-9477-a7c94cfdca06
Clarke, Catherine
9b091d13-bf1c-4f13-9477-a7c94cfdca06

Clarke, Catherine (ed.) (2017) Power, identity and miracles on a medieval frontier, Routledge, 120pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

A thriving port, a frontier base for the lords of Gower and a multi-cultural urban community, the south Wales town of Swansea was an important centre in the Middle Ages, at a nexus of multiple identities, cultural practices and configurations of power. As the principal town of the Marcher lordship of Gower and seat of the Marcher lord's rule, Swansea was a site of contested authority, colonial control and complex interactions – and collisions – between different cultures, languages and traditions. Swansea also features in the miracle collection prepared for the canonisation of Thomas Cantilupe, Bishop of Hereford (d. 1282), as the setting for the intriguing case of the hanging and strange revival of the Welsh rebel, William Cragh. Taking medieval Swansea and Wales as its starting point, this volume brings into focus questions of place, power, identity and belief, bringing together inter-disciplinary perspectives which span History, Literary Studies and Geography / Archaeology, and engaging with current debates in the fields of medieval frontier studies, urban history, manuscript studies and hagiography.

This book was originally published as a special issue of the Journal of Medieval History.

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More information

Published date: 2017
Additional Information: This is an edition as a book of the Special Issue of the Journal of Medieval History 41.3 (2015). It is edited by Clarke and also includes two contributions: 'Witnessing History: perspectives on medieval Swansea and its cultural contexts' (1-7) 'Place, identity and performance: spatial practices and social proxies in medieval Swansea' (8-24)
Organisations: English

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Local EPrints ID: 411675
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411675
PURE UUID: 2d3bcad2-9d86-4c38-b21f-2f964f3ea3a8

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Date deposited: 21 Jun 2017 16:33
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 14:01

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