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Microstructured fibres for sensing applications

Microstructured fibres for sensing applications
Microstructured fibres for sensing applications
Microstructured fibres (MOFs) are among the most innovative developments in optical fibre technology in recent years. These fibres contain arrays of tiny air holes that run along their length and define the waveguiding properties. Optical confinement and guidance in MOFs can be obtained either through modified total internal reflection, or photonic bandgap effects; correspondingly, they are classified into index-guiding Holey Fibres (HFs) and Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs). MOFs offer great flexibility in terms of fibre design and, by virtue of the large refractive index contrast between glass/air and the possibility to make wavelength-scale features, offer a range of unique properties. In this paper we review the current status of air/silica MOF design and fabrication and discuss the attractions of this technology within the field of sensors, including prospects for further development. We focus on two primary areas, which we believe to be of particular significance. Firstly, we discuss the use of fibres offering large evanescent fields, or, alternatively, guidance in an air core, to provide long interaction lengths for detection of trace chemicals in gas or liquid samples; an improved fibre design is presented and prospects for practical implementation in sensor systems are also analysed. Secondly, we discuss the application of photonic bandgap fibre technology for obtaining fibres operating beyond silica's transparency window, and in particular in the 3µm wavelength region.
15 pp
Petrovich, M.N.
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van Brakel, A.
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Poletti, F.
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Mukasa, K.
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Austin, E.A.
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Finazzi, V.
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Petropoulos, P.
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O'Driscoll, E.J.
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Watson, M.
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Delmonte, T.
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Monro, T.M.
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Dakin, J.P.
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Richardson, D.J.
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Petrovich, M.N.
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van Brakel, A.
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Poletti, F.
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Mukasa, K.
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Austin, E.A.
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Finazzi, V.
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Petropoulos, P.
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O'Driscoll, E.J.
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Watson, M.
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Delmonte, T.
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Monro, T.M.
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Dakin, J.P.
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Richardson, D.J.
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Petrovich, M.N., van Brakel, A., Poletti, F., Mukasa, K., Austin, E.A., Finazzi, V., Petropoulos, P., O'Driscoll, E.J., Watson, M., Delmonte, T., Monro, T.M., Dakin, J.P. and Richardson, D.J. (2005) Microstructured fibres for sensing applications. SPIE Optics East. 23 - 26 Oct 2005. 15 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Microstructured fibres (MOFs) are among the most innovative developments in optical fibre technology in recent years. These fibres contain arrays of tiny air holes that run along their length and define the waveguiding properties. Optical confinement and guidance in MOFs can be obtained either through modified total internal reflection, or photonic bandgap effects; correspondingly, they are classified into index-guiding Holey Fibres (HFs) and Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs). MOFs offer great flexibility in terms of fibre design and, by virtue of the large refractive index contrast between glass/air and the possibility to make wavelength-scale features, offer a range of unique properties. In this paper we review the current status of air/silica MOF design and fabrication and discuss the attractions of this technology within the field of sensors, including prospects for further development. We focus on two primary areas, which we believe to be of particular significance. Firstly, we discuss the use of fibres offering large evanescent fields, or, alternatively, guidance in an air core, to provide long interaction lengths for detection of trace chemicals in gas or liquid samples; an improved fibre design is presented and prospects for practical implementation in sensor systems are also analysed. Secondly, we discuss the application of photonic bandgap fibre technology for obtaining fibres operating beyond silica's transparency window, and in particular in the 3µm wavelength region.

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Published date: 2005
Venue - Dates: SPIE Optics East, 2005-10-23 - 2005-10-26

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 41168
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/41168
PURE UUID: 9f404019-ef6b-4977-ae52-c916e4ea3553
ORCID for M.N. Petrovich: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3905-5901
ORCID for F. Poletti: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1000-3083
ORCID for P. Petropoulos: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1576-8034
ORCID for D.J. Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7751-1058

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Jul 2006
Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 01:02

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