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Early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

Early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease
Early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease
The incidence of early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. Defined as a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified before the age of 10 years, the disease is complex, multifactorial, and lifelong, and affects nutrition and psychological wellbeing. Over 200 genes have been implicated and a further 52 genes are known to cause monogenic disease, often presenting in infancy. Heritability of early-onset inflammatory bowel disease is hypothesised to be between that of infantile-onset (ie, <6 years old) and adult-onset disease, with genetic cause characterised by a few genes with modest or large effect size. Although early-onset disease is typically more severe than infantile-onset and adult-onset disease, long-term morbidity has not been assessed. Disease management is multifaceted and multidisciplinary, and is focused on the safe induction of remission and prevention of relapse. Although the advent of monoclonal antibody therapy has had a positive effect in the management of inflammatory bowel disease, treatment effects in early-onset inflammatory bowel disease are less certain. Additional challenges include maintenance of growth, navigation of puberty, and transition to adult services for long-term management.
2352-4650
147-158
Ashton, James
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Ennis, Sarah
7b57f188-9d91-4beb-b217-09856146f1e9
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71
Ashton, James
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Ennis, Sarah
7b57f188-9d91-4beb-b217-09856146f1e9
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71

Ashton, James, Ennis, Sarah and Beattie, R. Mark (2017) Early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, 1 (2), 147-158. (doi:10.1016/S2352-4642(17)30017-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The incidence of early-onset paediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing worldwide. Defined as a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, or inflammatory bowel disease unclassified before the age of 10 years, the disease is complex, multifactorial, and lifelong, and affects nutrition and psychological wellbeing. Over 200 genes have been implicated and a further 52 genes are known to cause monogenic disease, often presenting in infancy. Heritability of early-onset inflammatory bowel disease is hypothesised to be between that of infantile-onset (ie, <6 years old) and adult-onset disease, with genetic cause characterised by a few genes with modest or large effect size. Although early-onset disease is typically more severe than infantile-onset and adult-onset disease, long-term morbidity has not been assessed. Disease management is multifaceted and multidisciplinary, and is focused on the safe induction of remission and prevention of relapse. Although the advent of monoclonal antibody therapy has had a positive effect in the management of inflammatory bowel disease, treatment effects in early-onset inflammatory bowel disease are less certain. Additional challenges include maintenance of growth, navigation of puberty, and transition to adult services for long-term management.

Text 06_06_17_untracked Early onset IBD - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 August 2017
Published date: October 2017
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411717
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411717
ISSN: 2352-4650
PURE UUID: 57b9dd8a-bc3e-4e09-88e4-cda150b32589

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 06 Oct 2018 04:09

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