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Electronic metal-support interaction enhancedoxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

Electronic metal-support interaction enhancedoxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum
Electronic metal-support interaction enhancedoxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum
Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50–100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.
Jackson, Colleen
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Smith, Graham
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Inwood, David
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Leach, Andrew, Stephen
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Whalley, Penny, Susan
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Callisti, Mauro
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Polcar, Tomas
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Russell, Andrea E.
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Levecque, Pieter
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Kramer, Denis
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Jackson, Colleen
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Smith, Graham
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Inwood, David
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Leach, Andrew, Stephen
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Whalley, Penny, Susan
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Callisti, Mauro
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Polcar, Tomas
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Russell, Andrea E.
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Levecque, Pieter
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Kramer, Denis
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Jackson, Colleen, Smith, Graham, Inwood, David, Leach, Andrew, Stephen, Whalley, Penny, Susan, Callisti, Mauro, Polcar, Tomas, Russell, Andrea E., Levecque, Pieter and Kramer, Denis (2017) Electronic metal-support interaction enhancedoxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum. Nature Communications, 8 (May), [15802]. (doi:10.1038/ncomms15802).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50–100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 May 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 June 2017
Organisations: Engineering Science Unit, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute, Education Hub, Chemistry, Engineering Mats & Surface Engineerg Gp, Electrochemistry, nCATS Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411759
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411759
PURE UUID: d9d660bc-29a8-4d83-855e-4827eddb3893
ORCID for Tomas Polcar: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0863-6287
ORCID for Andrea E. Russell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8382-6443

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:59

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Contributors

Author: Colleen Jackson
Author: Graham Smith
Author: David Inwood
Author: Andrew, Stephen Leach
Author: Penny, Susan Whalley
Author: Mauro Callisti
Author: Tomas Polcar ORCID iD
Author: Pieter Levecque
Author: Denis Kramer

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