The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Mono-jet, -photon and -Z signals of a supersymmetric (B-L) model at the Large Hadron Collider

Mono-jet, -photon and -Z signals of a supersymmetric (B-L) model at the Large Hadron Collider
Mono-jet, -photon and -Z signals of a supersymmetric (B-L) model at the Large Hadron Collider
Search for invisible final states produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by new physics scenarios are normally carried out resorting to a variety of probes emerging from the initial state, in the form of single-jet, -photon and -Z boson signatures. These are particularly effective for models of Supersymmetry (SUSY) in presence of R-parity conservation, owing to the presence in their spectra of a stable neutralino as dark matter candidate. We assume here as theoretical framework Supersymmetric (B-L) extension of the Standard Model (BLSSM), wherein a mediator for invisible decays can be Z' boson. The peculiarity of the signal is thus that the final state objects carry a very large (transverse) missing energy, since the Z'  is naturally massive and constrained by direct searches and electro-weak precision tests to be at least in TeV scale region. Under these circumstances the efficiency in accessing the invisible final state and rejecting the standard model background is very high. This somehow compensates the rather meagre production rates. Another special feature of this invisible BLSSM signal is its composition, which is often dominated by sneutrino decays (alongside the more traditional neutrino and neutralino modes). Sensitivity of the CERN machine to these two features can therefore help disentangling the BLSSM from more popular SUSY models. We assess in this analysis the scope of the LHC in establishing the aforementioned invisible signals through a sophisticated signal-to-background simulation carried out in presence of parton shower, hadronisation and detector effects. We find that significant sensitivity exists already after 300 fb-1 during Run 2. We find that mono-jet events can be readily accessible at the LHC, so as to enable one to claim a prompt discovery, while mono-photon and -Z signals can be used as diagnostic tools of the underlying scenario.
hep-ph
1029-8479
1-21
Abdallah, W.
00142194-61cb-49ee-a114-becfcd06886d
Fiaschi, J.
a417f04d-05ec-4bff-bdee-ba20ac560fa7
Khalil, S.
6021465e-2f5d-4677-846d-05aebc4499f6
Moretti, S.
b57cf0f0-4bc3-4e02-96e3-071255366614
Abdallah, W.
00142194-61cb-49ee-a114-becfcd06886d
Fiaschi, J.
a417f04d-05ec-4bff-bdee-ba20ac560fa7
Khalil, S.
6021465e-2f5d-4677-846d-05aebc4499f6
Moretti, S.
b57cf0f0-4bc3-4e02-96e3-071255366614

Abdallah, W., Fiaschi, J., Khalil, S. and Moretti, S. (2016) Mono-jet, -photon and -Z signals of a supersymmetric (B-L) model at the Large Hadron Collider. The Journal of High Energy Physics, 2016 (02), 1-21. (doi:10.1007/JHEP02(2016)157).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Search for invisible final states produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) by new physics scenarios are normally carried out resorting to a variety of probes emerging from the initial state, in the form of single-jet, -photon and -Z boson signatures. These are particularly effective for models of Supersymmetry (SUSY) in presence of R-parity conservation, owing to the presence in their spectra of a stable neutralino as dark matter candidate. We assume here as theoretical framework Supersymmetric (B-L) extension of the Standard Model (BLSSM), wherein a mediator for invisible decays can be Z' boson. The peculiarity of the signal is thus that the final state objects carry a very large (transverse) missing energy, since the Z'  is naturally massive and constrained by direct searches and electro-weak precision tests to be at least in TeV scale region. Under these circumstances the efficiency in accessing the invisible final state and rejecting the standard model background is very high. This somehow compensates the rather meagre production rates. Another special feature of this invisible BLSSM signal is its composition, which is often dominated by sneutrino decays (alongside the more traditional neutrino and neutralino modes). Sensitivity of the CERN machine to these two features can therefore help disentangling the BLSSM from more popular SUSY models. We assess in this analysis the scope of the LHC in establishing the aforementioned invisible signals through a sophisticated signal-to-background simulation carried out in presence of parton shower, hadronisation and detector effects. We find that significant sensitivity exists already after 300 fb-1 during Run 2. We find that mono-jet events can be readily accessible at the LHC, so as to enable one to claim a prompt discovery, while mono-photon and -Z signals can be used as diagnostic tools of the underlying scenario.

Text
Abdallah2016_Article_Mono-jet-photonAnd-ZSignalsOfA - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (823kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 February 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 February 2016
Published date: February 2016
Additional Information: 21 pages, 13 figures and 9 tables
Keywords: hep-ph
Organisations: Theory Group, Physics & Astronomy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411852
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411852
ISSN: 1029-8479
PURE UUID: 973bd9ac-da3c-4fc6-9537-b1b376f37fc5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 19:43

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: W. Abdallah
Author: J. Fiaschi
Author: S. Khalil
Author: S. Moretti

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×