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Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials

Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials
Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials
Gentle remediation options (GRO), i.e. in situ stabilisation, (aided) phytoextraction and (aided) phytostabilisation, were implemented at ten European sites contaminated with trace elements (TE) from various anthropogenic sources: mining, atmospheric fallout, landfill leachates, wood preservatives, dredged-sediments, and dumped wastes. To assess the performance of the GRO options, topsoil was collected from each field trial, potted, and cultivated with lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) for 48 days. Shoot dry weight (DW) yield, photosynthesis efficiency and major element and TE concentrations in the soil pore water and lettuce shoots were measured.

GRO implementation had a limited effect on TE concentrations in the soil pore water, although use of multivariate Co-inertia Analysis revealed a clear amelioration effect in phytomanaged soils. Phytomanagement increased shoot DW yield at all industrial and mine sites, whereas in agricultural soils improvements were produced in one out of five sites. Photosynthesis efficiency was less sensitive than changes in shoot biomass and did not discriminate changes in soil conditions.

Based on lettuce shoot DW yield, compost amendment followed by phytoextraction yielded better results than phytostabilisation; moreover shoot ionome data proved that, depending on initial soil conditions, recurrent compost application may be required to maintain crop production with common shoot nutrient concentrations.
0048-9697
1388-1398
Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino
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Marchand, Lilian
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Kidd, Petra S.
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Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang
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Puschenreiter, Markus
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Kumpiene, Jurate
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Müller, Ingo
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Neu, Silke
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Janssen, Jolien
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Vangronsveld, Jaco
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Dimitriou, Ioannis
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Siebielec, Grzegorz
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Galazka, Rafal
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Bert, Valerie
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Herzig, Rolf
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Cundy, Andrew B.
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Oustriere, Nadege
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Kolbas, Aliaksandr
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Galland, William
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Mench, Michel
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Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino
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Marchand, Lilian
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Kidd, Petra S.
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Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang
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Puschenreiter, Markus
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Kumpiene, Jurate
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Müller, Ingo
26c5f104-2aa8-449f-a77d-e5926fc8f7b4
Neu, Silke
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Janssen, Jolien
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Vangronsveld, Jaco
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Dimitriou, Ioannis
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Siebielec, Grzegorz
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Galazka, Rafal
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Bert, Valerie
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Herzig, Rolf
a8e5ebd8-02b4-4fb9-b420-e7ccf205f563
Cundy, Andrew B.
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Oustriere, Nadege
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Kolbas, Aliaksandr
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Galland, William
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Mench, Michel
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Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino, Marchand, Lilian, Kidd, Petra S., Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang, Puschenreiter, Markus, Kumpiene, Jurate, Müller, Ingo, Neu, Silke, Janssen, Jolien, Vangronsveld, Jaco, Dimitriou, Ioannis, Siebielec, Grzegorz, Galazka, Rafal, Bert, Valerie, Herzig, Rolf, Cundy, Andrew B., Oustriere, Nadege, Kolbas, Aliaksandr, Galland, William and Mench, Michel (2017) Assessing phytotoxicity of trace element-contaminated soils phytomanaged with gentle remediation options at ten European field trials. Science of the Total Environment, 599-600, 1388-1398. (doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.04.187).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Gentle remediation options (GRO), i.e. in situ stabilisation, (aided) phytoextraction and (aided) phytostabilisation, were implemented at ten European sites contaminated with trace elements (TE) from various anthropogenic sources: mining, atmospheric fallout, landfill leachates, wood preservatives, dredged-sediments, and dumped wastes. To assess the performance of the GRO options, topsoil was collected from each field trial, potted, and cultivated with lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) for 48 days. Shoot dry weight (DW) yield, photosynthesis efficiency and major element and TE concentrations in the soil pore water and lettuce shoots were measured.

GRO implementation had a limited effect on TE concentrations in the soil pore water, although use of multivariate Co-inertia Analysis revealed a clear amelioration effect in phytomanaged soils. Phytomanagement increased shoot DW yield at all industrial and mine sites, whereas in agricultural soils improvements were produced in one out of five sites. Photosynthesis efficiency was less sensitive than changes in shoot biomass and did not discriminate changes in soil conditions.

Based on lettuce shoot DW yield, compost amendment followed by phytoextraction yielded better results than phytostabilisation; moreover shoot ionome data proved that, depending on initial soil conditions, recurrent compost application may be required to maintain crop production with common shoot nutrient concentrations.

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CQuintela-Sabaris et al accepted MS - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 May 2017
Published date: 1 December 2017
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science, Geochemistry, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411924
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411924
ISSN: 0048-9697
PURE UUID: 14e59224-6d93-4b38-b781-5bbd24ff4de6
ORCID for Andrew B. Cundy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4368-2569

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Date deposited: 30 Jun 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:25

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