The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Examining task, social and information networks in submarine command and control

Examining task, social and information networks in submarine command and control
Examining task, social and information networks in submarine command and control
Submarine control room operations have not changed much over the past 50 years, despite introduction of new technologies. This study sought to catalogue current operations as a baseline for comparing new ways of working. Three scenarios were selected to be examined in both high and low demand: returning to periscope depth, dived tracking and inshore operations. The scenarios were run in a submarine simulator with a currently serving submariners from the Royal Navy. The flow of information throughout the submarine command team was examined using Event Analysis for Systemic Teamwork (EAST). EAST models collaborative teamwork via three networks; task, social, and information. Results show that the social interactions, information transition and focus of tasks are different depending on the particular operation being completed and the work demand placed on the command team. There are particular information elements that are fundamental across all scenario types. Task and communication load is not evenly distributed across the team, with potential bottlenecks identified between the Sonar Controller and Operations Officer roles. Implications of the results are discussed alongside
recommendations for future research.
2168-2291
252-265
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893

Stanton, Neville and Roberts, Aaron (2017) Examining task, social and information networks in submarine command and control. IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems, 48 (3), 252-265. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Submarine control room operations have not changed much over the past 50 years, despite introduction of new technologies. This study sought to catalogue current operations as a baseline for comparing new ways of working. Three scenarios were selected to be examined in both high and low demand: returning to periscope depth, dived tracking and inshore operations. The scenarios were run in a submarine simulator with a currently serving submariners from the Royal Navy. The flow of information throughout the submarine command team was examined using Event Analysis for Systemic Teamwork (EAST). EAST models collaborative teamwork via three networks; task, social, and information. Results show that the social interactions, information transition and focus of tasks are different depending on the particular operation being completed and the work demand placed on the command team. There are particular information elements that are fundamental across all scenario types. Task and communication load is not evenly distributed across the team, with potential bottlenecks identified between the Sonar Controller and Operations Officer roles. Implications of the results are discussed alongside
recommendations for future research.

Text
Examining task, social and - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 June 2017
Organisations: Transportation Group, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411930
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411930
ISSN: 2168-2291
PURE UUID: 51a30e02-565c-4619-baba-f298b08c4d8c
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jun 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×