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AGN wind scaling relations and the co-evolution of black holes and galaxies

AGN wind scaling relations and the co-evolution of black holes and galaxies
AGN wind scaling relations and the co-evolution of black holes and galaxies
Context. Feedback from accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) is often identified as the main mechanism responsible for regulating star formation in active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies. However, the relationships between AGN activity, radiation, winds, and star formation are complex and still far from being understood.
Aims. We study scaling relations between AGN properties, host galaxy properties, and AGN winds. We then evaluate the wind mean impact on the global star formation history, taking into account the short AGN duty cycle with respect to that of star formation.
Methods. We first collect AGN wind observations for 94 AGN with detected massive winds at sub-pc to kpc spatial scales. We then fold AGN wind scaling relations with AGN luminosity functions, to evaluate the average AGN wind mass-loading factor as a function of cosmic time.
Results. We find strong correlations between the AGN molecular and ionised wind mass outflow rates and the AGN bolometric luminosity. The power law scaling is steeper for ionised winds (slope 1.29 ± 0.38) than for molecular winds (0.76 ± 0.06), meaning that the two rates converge at high bolometric luminosities. The molecular gas depletion timescale and the molecular gas fraction of galaxies hosting powerful AGN driven winds are 3–10 times shorter and smaller than those of main sequence galaxies with similar star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and redshift. These findings suggest that, at high AGN bolometric luminosity, the reduced molecular gas fraction may be due to the destruction of molecules by the wind, leading to a larger fraction of gas in the atomic ionised phase. The AGN wind mass-loading factor η = ṀOF/SFR is systematically higher than that of starburst driven winds.
Conclusions. Our analysis shows that AGN winds are, on average, powerful enough to clean galaxies from their molecular gas only in massive systems at z ≲ 2, i.e. a strong form of co-evolution between SMBHs and galaxies appears to break down for the least massive galaxies.
0004-6361
1-21
Fiore, F.
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Feruglio, C.
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Shankar, F.
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Bischetti, M.
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Bongiorno, A.
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Brusa, M.
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Carniani, S.
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Cicone, C.
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Duras, F.
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Lamastra, A.
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Mainieri, V.
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Marconi, A.
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Menci, N.
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Maiolino, R.
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Piconcelli, E.
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Vietri, G.
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Zappacosta, L.
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Fiore, F.
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Feruglio, C.
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Shankar, F.
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Bischetti, M.
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Bongiorno, A.
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Brusa, M.
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Carniani, S.
655ca500-5d98-4164-bd16-98f3d98fc2b9
Cicone, C.
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Duras, F.
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Lamastra, A.
d6b32163-e02f-4c9f-bb21-418e13d8acba
Mainieri, V.
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Marconi, A.
75f5cc51-1571-476c-b7f5-04218bf9368a
Menci, N.
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Maiolino, R.
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Piconcelli, E.
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Vietri, G.
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Zappacosta, L.
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Fiore, F., Feruglio, C., Shankar, F., Bischetti, M., Bongiorno, A., Brusa, M., Carniani, S., Cicone, C., Duras, F., Lamastra, A., Mainieri, V., Marconi, A., Menci, N., Maiolino, R., Piconcelli, E., Vietri, G. and Zappacosta, L. (2017) AGN wind scaling relations and the co-evolution of black holes and galaxies. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 601, 1-21, [A143]. (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201629478).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Context. Feedback from accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) is often identified as the main mechanism responsible for regulating star formation in active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies. However, the relationships between AGN activity, radiation, winds, and star formation are complex and still far from being understood.
Aims. We study scaling relations between AGN properties, host galaxy properties, and AGN winds. We then evaluate the wind mean impact on the global star formation history, taking into account the short AGN duty cycle with respect to that of star formation.
Methods. We first collect AGN wind observations for 94 AGN with detected massive winds at sub-pc to kpc spatial scales. We then fold AGN wind scaling relations with AGN luminosity functions, to evaluate the average AGN wind mass-loading factor as a function of cosmic time.
Results. We find strong correlations between the AGN molecular and ionised wind mass outflow rates and the AGN bolometric luminosity. The power law scaling is steeper for ionised winds (slope 1.29 ± 0.38) than for molecular winds (0.76 ± 0.06), meaning that the two rates converge at high bolometric luminosities. The molecular gas depletion timescale and the molecular gas fraction of galaxies hosting powerful AGN driven winds are 3–10 times shorter and smaller than those of main sequence galaxies with similar star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, and redshift. These findings suggest that, at high AGN bolometric luminosity, the reduced molecular gas fraction may be due to the destruction of molecules by the wind, leading to a larger fraction of gas in the atomic ionised phase. The AGN wind mass-loading factor η = ṀOF/SFR is systematically higher than that of starburst driven winds.
Conclusions. Our analysis shows that AGN winds are, on average, powerful enough to clean galaxies from their molecular gas only in massive systems at z ≲ 2, i.e. a strong form of co-evolution between SMBHs and galaxies appears to break down for the least massive galaxies.

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1702.04507 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 13 February 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 May 2017
Published date: 23 May 2017
Additional Information: Arxiv record 1702.04507 author confirms AM copy.
Organisations: Astronomy Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411932
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411932
ISSN: 0004-6361
PURE UUID: 518ab3b2-0483-47f0-9e99-23a5192fcb3f

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Date deposited: 30 Jun 2017 16:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 19:10

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Contributors

Author: F. Fiore
Author: C. Feruglio
Author: F. Shankar
Author: M. Bischetti
Author: A. Bongiorno
Author: M. Brusa
Author: S. Carniani
Author: C. Cicone
Author: F. Duras
Author: A. Lamastra
Author: V. Mainieri
Author: A. Marconi
Author: N. Menci
Author: R. Maiolino
Author: E. Piconcelli
Author: G. Vietri
Author: L. Zappacosta

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