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Extreme textiles at the Cooper-Hewitt, New York (exhibition review)

Extreme textiles at the Cooper-Hewitt, New York (exhibition review)
Extreme textiles at the Cooper-Hewitt, New York (exhibition review)
In the decade that Matilda McQuaid, Exhibitions Curator and Head of the Textiles Department at the Cooper-Hewitt, has been researching high performance textiles countless new innovations and products have been realized. This exhibition adopts, for the most part, a pragmatic approach to the field with the inclusion of remarkable textiles that are in use right now, rather than future possibilities. Divided into the industry categories used to assess high performance textiles (stronger, faster, lighter, safer and smarter) it quickly becomes apparent that flexibility and lightness are what make the textile desirable in so many diverse applications. McQuaid concludes that extreme textiles offer us “some of the most innovative and purest examples of design today.” Ironically, many of these examples go unnoticed – not through our lack of perception – but because they are structures and materials embedded in our landscape, architecture, vehicles and even our own bodies.
Hemmings, Jessica
21e2ab3b-386a-46c2-8be2-12c78fe4cc22
Hemmings, Jessica
21e2ab3b-386a-46c2-8be2-12c78fe4cc22

Hemmings, Jessica (2005) Extreme textiles at the Cooper-Hewitt, New York (exhibition review). Selvedge.

Record type: Article

Abstract

In the decade that Matilda McQuaid, Exhibitions Curator and Head of the Textiles Department at the Cooper-Hewitt, has been researching high performance textiles countless new innovations and products have been realized. This exhibition adopts, for the most part, a pragmatic approach to the field with the inclusion of remarkable textiles that are in use right now, rather than future possibilities. Divided into the industry categories used to assess high performance textiles (stronger, faster, lighter, safer and smarter) it quickly becomes apparent that flexibility and lightness are what make the textile desirable in so many diverse applications. McQuaid concludes that extreme textiles offer us “some of the most innovative and purest examples of design today.” Ironically, many of these examples go unnoticed – not through our lack of perception – but because they are structures and materials embedded in our landscape, architecture, vehicles and even our own bodies.

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Published date: September 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 41197
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/41197
PURE UUID: 84809da4-3562-486c-8ec7-1985a05f77fc

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Aug 2006
Last modified: 23 Apr 2020 16:45

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