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A planar respiration sensor based on a capaciflector structure

A planar respiration sensor based on a capaciflector structure
A planar respiration sensor based on a capaciflector structure
Respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect more than 300 million people worldwide. Devices such as the pneumotachograph are currently used within a clinical environment for measuring inhalation, expiration and respiration cycle but are physically large and not suitable for home use by patients. A small, lightweight respiration sensor for use in the home environment, allows patients to monitor respiratory rate in a simple manner. The capaciflector was originally developed by NASA as a capacitive proximity sensor for collision detection in robots. We have found that the device can also be used to detect breathing patterns in humans by attaching it to the chest. In this letter, we discuss the simulation, construction and testing of a capaciflector for use as a respiration sensor and describe how it can be interfaced to a microcontroller in order to allow wireless data transmission over a Wi-Fi signal.
Medical sensor, capaciflector, planar respiration sensor, sensor interfacing
2475-1472
1-4
White, Neil M.
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c
Ash, Jordan
e11a06c3-db08-4a6a-8093-5d9ca27a5679
Wei, Yang
c6d13914-4f35-459c-8c25-8f8b77b7c5b3
Akerman, Harry
7eb1effe-210d-4f85-a108-1ff6601e88f1
White, Neil M.
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c
Ash, Jordan
e11a06c3-db08-4a6a-8093-5d9ca27a5679
Wei, Yang
c6d13914-4f35-459c-8c25-8f8b77b7c5b3
Akerman, Harry
7eb1effe-210d-4f85-a108-1ff6601e88f1

White, Neil M., Ash, Jordan, Wei, Yang and Akerman, Harry (2017) A planar respiration sensor based on a capaciflector structure. IEEE Sensor Letters, 1 (4), 1-4. (doi:10.1109/LSENS.2017.2722481).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect more than 300 million people worldwide. Devices such as the pneumotachograph are currently used within a clinical environment for measuring inhalation, expiration and respiration cycle but are physically large and not suitable for home use by patients. A small, lightweight respiration sensor for use in the home environment, allows patients to monitor respiratory rate in a simple manner. The capaciflector was originally developed by NASA as a capacitive proximity sensor for collision detection in robots. We have found that the device can also be used to detect breathing patterns in humans by attaching it to the chest. In this letter, we discuss the simulation, construction and testing of a capaciflector for use as a respiration sensor and describe how it can be interfaced to a microcontroller in order to allow wireless data transmission over a Wi-Fi signal.

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Capaciflector_revised_reformatted - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 July 2017
Published date: August 2017
Keywords: Medical sensor, capaciflector, planar respiration sensor, sensor interfacing
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412021
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412021
ISSN: 2475-1472
PURE UUID: 21bc8e0f-fe4d-4a38-bb15-925763087f12
ORCID for Neil M. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1532-6452
ORCID for Yang Wei: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6195-8595

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2017 16:31
Last modified: 02 Jul 2020 00:31

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